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How an Amazon Worker Stole iPads

A worker in Amazon's packaging department in India figured out how to deliver electronics to himself:

Since he was employed with the packaging department, he had easy access to order numbers. Using the order numbers, he packed his order himself; but instead of putting pressure cookers in the box, he stuffed it with iPhones, iPads, watches, cameras, and other expensive electronics in the pressure cooker box. Before dispatching the order, the godown also has a mechanism to weigh the package. To dodge this, Bhamble stuffed equipment of equivalent weight," an officer from Vithalwadi police station said. Bhamble confessed to the cops that he had ordered pressure cookers thrice in the last 15 days. After he placed the order, instead of, say, packing a five-kg pressure cooker, he would stuff gadgets of equivalent weight. After receiving delivery clearance, he would then deliver the goods himself and store it at his house. Speaking to mid-day, Deputy Commissioner of Police (Zone IV) Vasant Jadhav said, "Bhamble's job profile was of goods packaging at Amazon.com's warehouse in Bhiwandi.

Posted on July 24, 2015 at 12:49 PMView Comments

AT&T's iPad Security Breach

I didn't write about the recent security breach that disclosed tens of thousands of e-mail addresses and ICC-IDs of iPad users because, well, there was nothing terribly interesting about it. It was yet another web security breach.

Right after the incident, though, I was being interviewed by a reporter that wanted to know what the ramifications of the breach were. He specifically wanted to know if anything could be done with those ICC-IDs, and if the disclosure of that information was worse than people thought. He didn't like the answer I gave him, which is that no one knows yet: that it's too early to know the full effects of that information disclosure, and that both the good guys and the bad guys would be figuring it out in the coming weeks. And, that it's likely that there were further security implications of the breach.

Seems like there were:

The problem is that ICC-IDs—unique serial numbers that identify each SIM card—can often be converted into IMSIs. While the ICC-ID is nonsecret—it's often found printed on the boxes of cellphone/SIM bundles—the IMSI is somewhat secret. In theory, knowing an ICC-ID shouldn't be enough to determine an IMSI. The phone companies do need to know which IMSI corresponds to which ICC-ID, but this should be done by looking up the values in a big database.

In practice, however, many phone companies simply calculate the IMSI from the ICC-ID. This calculation is often very simple indeed, being little more complex than "combine this hard-coded value with the last nine digits of the ICC-ID." So while the leakage of AT&T's customers' ICC-IDs should be harmless, in practice, it could reveal a secret ID.

What can be done with that secret ID? Quite a lot, it turns out. The IMSI is sent by the phone to the network when first signing on to the network; it's used by the network to figure out which call should be routed where. With someone else's IMSI, an attacker can determine the person's name and phone number, and even track his or her position. It also opens the door to active attacks—creating fake cell towers that a victim's phone will connect to, enabling every call and text message to be eavesdropped.

More to come, I'm sure.

And that's really the point: we all want to know -- right away -- the effects of a security vulnerability, but often we don't and can't. It takes time before the full effects are known, sometimes a lot of time.

And in related news, the image redaction that went along with some of the breach reporting wasn't very good.

Posted on June 21, 2010 at 5:27 AMView Comments

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