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Schneier on Security: Essays Tagged Network World

Schneier on Security

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Essays Tagged “Network World”

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Security in the Cloud

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Network World
  • February 15, 2006

One of the basic philosophies of security is defense in depth: overlapping systems designed to provide security even if one of them fails. An example is a firewall coupled with an intrusion-detection system (IDS). Defense in depth provides security, because there's no single point of failure and no assumed single vector for attacks.

It is for this reason that a choice between implementing network security in the middle of the network -- in the cloud -- or at the endpoints is a false dichotomy.

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Is Two-Factor Authentication Too Little, Too Late?

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Network World
  • April 4, 2005

Recently I published an essay arguing that two-factor authentication is an ineffective defense against identity theft (see www.schneier.com/essay-083.html). For example, issuing tokens to online banking customers won't reduce fraud, because new attack techniques simply ignore the countermeasure. Unfortunately, some took my essay as a condemnation of two-factor authentication in general. This is not true.

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Microsoft's Actions Speak Louder Than Words

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Network World
  • May 31, 2004

The security of your computer and network depends on two things: what you do to secure your computer and network, and what everyone else does to secure their computers and networks. It's not enough for you to maintain a secure network. If other people don't maintain their security, we're all more vulnerable to attack. When many unsecure computers are connected to the Internet, worms spread faster and more extensively, distributed denial-of-service attacks are easier to launch, and spammers have more platforms from which to send e-mail.

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Should Vendors be Liable for Their Software's Security Flaws?

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Network World
  • April 22, 2002

Network security is not a technological problem; it's a business problem. The only way to address it is to focus on business motivations. To improve the security of their products, companies - both vendors and users - must care; for companies to care, the problem must affect stock price. The way to make this happen is to start enforcing liabilities.

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Security for Remote Access VPNs Must Be Simple

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Network World
  • March 2, 1998

Unlike site-to-site VPNs, where remote offices are hard-wired to a central facility firewall, remote access VPNs are fraught with security problems. Much of the security consists of trusted passwords that traveling workers use on their notebook computers.

To be effective, a VPN's security implementation must be user-friendly while not penalizing your enterprise in other ways, such as by degrading network performance or compromising corporate control of the remote access network.

Think of the lock on the front door of your home.

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Electronic Speech - For Domestic Use Only

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Network World
  • January 16, 1995

The U.S. State Department recently ruled that some forms of electronic speech are not protected by the First Amendment and can be prohibited from export. This decision raises questions about freedom of speech on the information superhighway. As business communications continue to migrate from paper mail to electronic mail, these questions will become more important.

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CDDI Breathes Life into FDDI Standard

  • Bruce Schneier
  • Network World
  • September 7, 1992

Why should anyone care about Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) anymore?

Wiring an office with fiber is expensive, as is purchasing fiberoptic switching and relay equipment. And with Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) on the horizon, which promises flexible data rates of 150M to 600M bit/sec, FDDI's 100M bit/sec data rate hardly seems worth it.

But the recent emergence of FDDI over copper wiring under the evolving Copper Distributed Data Interface (CDDI) standard changes all that.

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Photo of Bruce Schneier by Per Ervland.

Schneier on Security is a personal website. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of IBM Resilient.