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Truth, Beauty, and Oliver Sacks

Simon Callow

Lost Calcutta

Maya Jasanoff

O Billionaires!

Ben Fountain

In Love with Multiplicity

Joseph Leo Koerner

An Indictment in All But Name

David Cole

Featured Articles

The Fog of Ambition

Thomas Powers “Almost great” is George Packer’s measured judgment on the life and character of the American diplomat Richard Holbrooke, who was trying to broker an end to the war in Afghanistan when he died suddenly in 2010. Holbrooke left the war pretty much as he found it, and peace is no closer now, nearly a decade later, but that isn’t what explains the cruel precision of Packer’s judgment. It’s the man. Holbrooke had the serious intent, the energy, the friends, the wit, and even the luck needed to accomplish great things, but he fell short. Packer circles the question of why in his new biography, Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century, but the force of the man survives the interrogation. More 

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Table of contents
Berger’s Ways of Being
Lisa Appignanesi If Berger’s ultimate vision is bleak, his way of seeing, together with the power of his prose, has leapt across the years to give hope to new and younger generations.

Table of contents
Table of contents
Table of contents
Table of contents