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Smaller Bands: Web Propels Music Sales : NPR

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Smaller Bands: Web Propels Music Sales Not all musicians support the current crackdown on Internet file sharing. Some give their music away for free, trading some record sales in the hopes that they'll get more exposure from offering the downloads. The band Nine Inch Nails is currently streaming their new album online, ahead of the CD's commercial release Tuesday.

Smaller Bands: Web Propels Music Sales

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Smaller Bands: Web Propels Music Sales

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Smaller Bands: Web Propels Music Sales

Smaller Bands: Web Propels Music Sales

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4626423/4626424" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
May 1, 200512:00 AM ET Heard on Weekend Edition Sunday

Laura Sydell

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Not all musicians support the current crackdown on Internet file sharing. Some give their music away for free, trading some record sales in the hopes that they'll get more exposure from offering the downloads.

The band Nine Inch Nails is currently streaming their new album online, ahead of the CD's commercial release Tuesday. And smaller bands, like Jupiter Sunrise, attribute a spike in concert sales to the Web's influence.

Related NPR Stories

Industry Hopes Dual-Disc Tech Will Stem Piracy April 25, 2005 A Spring Music Break at South By Southwest April 15, 2005 Entertainment Industry Files More Piracy Lawsuits April 13, 2005 Legal Action Unlikely to Deter File-Sharing April 13, 2005

Web Resources

Music at MySpace Jupiter Sunrise Site Jupiter Sunrise at MySpace