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Psychology from Islamic Perspective: Contributions of Early Muslim Scholars and Challenges to Contemporary Muslim Psychologists on JSTOR

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Psychology from Islamic Perspective: Contributions of Early Muslim Scholars and Challenges to Contemporary Muslim Psychologists

Amber Haque Journal of Religion and Health Vol. 43, No. 4 (Winter, 2004), pp. 357-377 Published by: Springer https://www.jstor.org/stable/27512819 Page Count: 21

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Topics: Muslims, Soul, Islamic philosophy, Psychology of religion, Intellect, Treatises, Social psychology, Agent intellect Give feedback Were these topics helpful?

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  • Journal Info Journal of Religion and Health Description: Journal of Religion and Health is an international publication concerned with the creative partnership of psychology and religion/sprituality and the relationship between religion/spirituality and both mental and physical health.

    Founded in 1961 by the Blanton-Peale Institute, which joins the perspectives of psychology and religion, Journal of Religion and Health explores the most contemporary modes of religious thought with particular emphasis on their relevance to current medical and psychological research. Using an eclectic approach to the study of human values, health, and emotional welfare, this journal provides a scholarly forum for the discussion of topical themes on both a theoretical and practical level.

    This multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary journal publishes peer-reviewed original contributions from scholars and professionals of all religious faiths. Articles may be clinical, statistical, theoretical, impressionistic, or anecdotal.

    Coverage: 1961-2014 (Vol. 1, No. 1 - Vol. 53, No. 6) Moving Wall: 3 years (What is the moving wall?)

    The "moving wall" represents the time period between the last issue available in JSTOR and the most recently published issue of a journal. Moving walls are generally represented in years. In rare instances, a publisher has elected to have a "zero" moving wall, so their current issues are available in JSTOR shortly after publication.
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    For example, if the current year is 2008 and a journal has a 5 year moving wall, articles from the year 2002 are available.

    Terms Related to the Moving Wall
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    ISSN: 00224197 EISSN: 15736571 Subjects: Religion, Humanities Collections: Arts & Sciences V Collection, Religion & Theology Collection
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Abstract

Early Muslims wrote extensively about human nature and called it Ilm-al Nafsiat or self-knowledge. In many cases, their works seem to be the original ideas for many modern day psychological theories and practices. What is interesting however is that a lot of what the early scholars wrote was blended with Islamic philosophy and religious ideas. This paper covers major contributions of prominent early Muslim scholars to psychology and outlines the challenges faced by today's Muslims in adapting to the Western theories. It also offers a few recommendations on the indigenization of psychology for Muslim societies interested in seeking the Islamic perspective on human behaviors. Journal of Religion and Health © 2004 Springer Request Permissions

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