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The Rise of Big Business in the World Copper Industry 1870-1930 on JSTOR

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The Rise of Big Business in the World Copper Industry 1870-1930

Christopher Schmitz The Economic History Review New Series, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Aug., 1986), pp. 392-410 Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Economic History Society DOI: 10.2307/2596347 https://www.jstor.org/stable/2596347 Page Count: 19

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Topics: Copper, Copper mining, Copper industry, Market prices, Corporations, Mining methods, Smelting Give feedback Were these topics helpful?

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    The Economic History Review publishes articles based on original research on all aspects of economic and social history. The Review is edited on behalf of the Economic History Society by leading scholars. It has been published since 1927 and is one of the world's leading journals in the field. The Review welcomes contributions based on the full range of methodological approaches used by economic and social historians and is pleased to publish high quality research on the economic and social history of any area of the world. The emphasis is on broad coverage of themes of economic and social change, including their intellectual, political and cultural implications. In addition to regular papers, some issues contain contributions to a series of 'Surveys and Speculations' which are more reflective survey articles. For many years past a comprehensive annual list of publications on the economic and social history of Great Britain and Ireland has been published. Each issue also contains a substantial number of book reviews.
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    ISSN: 00130117 EISSN: 14680289 Subjects: Business & Economics, Business, History, Economics, History Collections: Arts & Sciences II Collection, Business & Economics Collection, Business I Collection, JSTOR Essential Collection
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Abstract

Despite a pronounced trend towards business concentration in the copper industry since the 1870s, there is limited evidence that these large-scale firms have had any sustained success in controlling a market which displays a long-term trend of increasing price instability. Big business in this industry seems best explained as a response to the necessary move to mining very large scale, low grade ore deposits, with consequent higher capital costs. The instability of metal markets also impelled firms to minimize transactions cost through a process of vertical integration. The Economic History Review © 1986 Economic History Society Request Permissions

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