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Coevolution of Genes and Languages Revisited on JSTOR

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Coevolution of Genes and Languages Revisited

L. L. Cavalli-Sforza, Eric Minch and J. L. Mountain Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Vol. 89, No. 12 (Jun. 15, 1992), pp. 5620-5624 Published by: National Academy of Sciences https://www.jstor.org/stable/2359705 Page Count: 5

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Topics: Evolutionary genetics, Language, Population genetics, Human genetics, Ethnolinguistics, Evolutionary linguistics, Datasets, Evolution, Geography Give feedback Were these topics helpful?

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    ISSN: 00278424 EISSN: 10916490 Subjects: Science & Mathematics, Biological Sciences, General Science Collections: Health & General Sciences Collection, JSTOR Archival Journal & Primary Source Collection, Life Sciences Collection
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Abstract

In an earlier paper it was shown that linguistic families of languages spoken by a set of 38 populations associate rather strongly with an evolutionary tree of the same populations derived from genetic data. While the correlation was clearly high, there was no evaluation of statistical significance; no such test was available at the time. This gap has now been filled by adapting to this aim a procedure based on the consistency index, and the level of significance is found to be much stronger than 10-3. Possible reasons for coevolution of strictly genetic characters and the strictly cultural linguistic system are discussed briefly. Results of this global analysis are compared with those obtained in independent local analyses. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America © 1992 National Academy of Sciences Request Permissions

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