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TO PASS, OVER THE ACTS OF THE PRESIDENT, HR 6810, A BILL PROHIBITING INTOXICATION BEVERAGES AND CONTROLLING THE MANUFACTURE AND USE OF ALCOHOL. -- GovTrack.us

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  1. Congress
  2. Votes
  3. Senate Vote #57 in 1919 (66th Congress)

TO PASS, OVER THE ACTS OF THE PRESIDENT, HR 6810, A BILL PROHIBITING INTOXICATION BEVERAGES AND CONTROLLING THE MANUFACTURE AND USE OF ALCOHOL.

Totals

All VotesRepublicansDemocratsYea68% 65 38 27 Nay21% 20 9 11 Not Voting11% 10 2 8

unknown. unknown Required. Oct 28, 1919 . Source: VoteView.com.

Ideology Vote Chart

Key: R Yea D Yea R Nay D Nay

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Vote Details

Notes: Accuracy of Historical Records

Our database of roll call votes from 1789-1989 (1990 for House votes) comes from an academic data source, VoteView.com, that has digitized paper records going back more than 200 years. Because of the difficulty of this task, the accuracy of these vote records is reduced.

From October 2014 through July 2015, we displayed incorrect vote totals in some cases. Although the total correctly reflected the announced positions of Members of Congress, the totals incorrectly included “paired” votes, which is when two Members of Congress, one planning to vote in favor and the other against, plan ahead of time to both abstain.

In addition, these records do not always distinguish between Members of Congress not voting (abstaining) from Members of Congress who were not eligible to vote because they had not yet taken office, or for other reasons. As a result, you may see extra not-voting entries and in these cases Senate votes may show more than 100 senators listed!

“Aye” or “Yea”?

“Aye” and “Yea” mean the same thing, and so do “No” and “Nay”. Congress uses different words in different sorts of votes.

The U.S. Constitution says that bills should be decided on by the “yeas and nays” (Article I, Section 7). Congress takes this literally and uses “yea” and “nay” when voting on the final passage of bills.

All Senate votes use these words. But the House of Representatives uses “Aye” and “No” in other sorts of votes.

Download as CSV VotePartyRepresentativeStateScoreYea   D   Ashurst, Henry AZ Yea   D   Bankhead, John AL Yea   D   Chamberlain, George OR Yea   D   Dial, Nathaniel SC Yea   D   Fletcher, Duncan FL Yea   D   Gore, Thomas OK Yea   D   Harris, William GA Yea   D   Harrison, Pat MS Yea   D   Henderson, Charles NV Yea   D   Jones, Andrieus NM Yea   D   Kendrick, John WY Yea   D   Kirby, William AR Yea   D   McKellar, Kenneth TN Yea   D   Myers, Henry MT Yea   D   Nugent, John ID Yea   D   Overman, Lee NC Yea   D   Owen, Robert OK Yea   D   Pomerene, Atlee OH Yea   D   Sheppard, Morris TX Yea   D   Simmons, Furnifold NC Yea   D   Smith, Hoke GA Yea   D   Smith, Marcus AZ Yea   D   Swanson, Claude VA Yea   D   Trammell, Park FL Yea   D   Walsh, Thomas MT Yea   D   Williams, John MS Yea   D   Wolcott, Josiah DE Yea   R   Ball, Lewis DE Yea   R   Capper, Arthur KS Yea   R   Colt, LeBaron RI Yea   R   Cummins, Albert IA Yea   R   Curtis, Charles KS Yea   R   Fernald, Bert ME Yea   R   Frelinghuysen, Joseph NJ Yea   R   Gronna, Asle ND Yea   R   Hale, Frederick ME Yea   R   Harding, Warren OH Yea   R   Johnson, Hiram CA Yea   R   Jones, Wesley WA Yea   R   Kellogg, Frank MN Yea   R   Kenyon, William IA Yea   R   Keyes, Henry NH Yea   R   Knox, Philander PA Yea   R   Lenroot, Irvine WI Yea   R   Lodge, Henry MA Yea   R   McCormick, Joseph IL Yea   R   McCumber, Porter ND Yea   R   McNary, Charles OR Yea   R   Moses, George NH Yea   R   Nelson, Knute MN Yea   R   New, Harry IN Yea   R   Newberry, Truman MI Yea   R   Norris, George NE Yea   R   Page, Carroll VT Yea   R   Phipps, Lawrence CO Yea   R   Poindexter, Miles WA Yea   R   Sherman, Lawrence IL Yea   R   Smoot, Reed UT Yea   R   Spencer, Selden MO Yea   R   Sterling, Thomas SD Yea   R   Sutherland, Howard WV Yea   R   Townsend, Charles MI Yea   R   Wadsworth, James NY Yea   R   Warren, Francis WY Yea   R   Watson, James IN Nay   D   Gay, Edward LA Nay   D   Gerry, Peter RI Nay   D   Hitchcock, Gilbert NE Nay   D   King, William UT Nay   D   Phelan, James CA Nay   D   Ransdell, Joseph LA Nay   D   Robinson, Joseph AR Nay   D   Shields, John TN Nay   D   Thomas, Charles CO Nay   D   Underwood, Oscar AL Nay   D   Walsh, David MA Nay   R   Borah, William ID Nay   R   Brandegee, Frank CT Nay   R   Calder, William NY Nay   R   Edge, Walter NJ Nay   R   Fall, Albert NM Nay   R   France, Joseph MD Nay   R   La Follette, Robert WI Nay   R   McLean, George CT Nay   R   Penrose, Boies PA No Vote   D   Beckham, John KY No Vote   D   Culberson, Charles TX No Vote   D   Johnson, Edwin SD No Vote   D   Pittman, Key NV No Vote   D   Reed, James MO No Vote   D   Smith, Ellison SC No Vote   D   Smith, John MD No Vote   D   Stanley, Augustus KY No Vote   R   Dillingham, William VT No Vote   R   Elkins, Davis WV

Statistically Notable Votes

Statistically notable votes are the votes that are most surprising, or least predictable, given how other members of each voter’s party voted.

All Votes

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