This website does readability filtering of other pages. All styles, scripts, forms and ads are stripped. If you want your website excluded or have other feedback, use this form.

Yale opens controversial college in Singapore | South China Morning Post

success fail Aug APR Sep 03 2013 2015 2017 25 captures 29 Aug 2013 - 17 Nov 2018 About this capture COLLECTED BY Organization: Internet Archive These crawls are part of an effort to archive pages as they are created and archive the pages that they refer to. That way, as the pages that are referenced are changed or taken from the web, a link to the version that was live when the page was written will be preserved.

Then the Internet Archive hopes that references to these archived pages will be put in place of a link that would be otherwise be broken, or a companion link to allow people to see what was originally intended by a page's authors.

The goal is to fix all broken links on the web. Crawls of supported "No More 404" sites. Collection: Wikipedia Near Real Time (from IRC) This is a collection of web page captures from links added to, or changed on, Wikipedia pages. The idea is to bring a reliability to Wikipedia outlinks so that if the pages referenced by Wikipedia articles are changed, or go away, a reader can permanently find what was originally referred to.

This is part of the Internet Archive's attempt to rid the web of broken links. TIMESTAMPS Jump to Navigation

Asia
  • Thu
  • Apr 2, 2015
  • Updated: 9:41pm

Main menu

You are here

Home News Asia

Trending

Occupy Central Xi Jinping's anti-graft campaign Lee Kuan Yew News›Asia SINGAPORE

Yale opens controversial college in Singapore

PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 27 August, 2013, 6:06pm UPDATED : Tuesday, 27 August, 2013, 6:06pm

Agence France-Presse in Singapore

Follow SCMP

SCMP

SCMP

SCMP

SCMP

SCMP

Most Popular

  1. Hong Kong's ATV denied new free-to-air licence as Exco pulls the plug on ailing broadcaster
  2. Then and now: photographs show Hong Kong harbourfront's startling transformation
  3. Scientists stumble upon cure for MRSA infections in 1,000-year-old book of natural remedies
  4. Chinese painter ‘threw cup at Cathay flight attendant for not serving him quickly enough’
  5. After 44 years, unsolved bank truck heist continues to fascinate in Japan
  1. Then and now: photographs show Hong Kong harbourfront's startling transformation
  2. Chinese painter ‘threw cup at Cathay flight attendant for not serving him quickly enough’
  3. Hong Kong's ATV denied new free-to-air licence as Exco pulls the plug on ailing broadcaster
  4. Scientists stumble upon cure for MRSA infections in 1,000-year-old book of natural remedies
  5. Google drops support for Chinese internet security certificates after trust breach
  1. Curbs imposed on Hong Kong trail running 'to protect country parks'
  2. Brazen behaviour: how fans like to party hard at Hong Kong Sevens
  3. Fiji win Hong Kong Sevens title with 33-19 win over New Zealand
  4. Zou Shiming's world title dream in tatters after shock defeat by Amnat Ruenroeng
  5. Another stunner from fabulous Fiji at Hong Kong Sevens

Promotions

WIN FREE MOVIE TICKETS TO WATCH THE SPONGEBOB MOVIE Wine Circle invites you to a masterclass with Allen Meadows
Singapore's President Tony Tan Keng Yam (second right) attends the inauguration ceremony of Yale-National University of Singapore (NUS) College held at Singapore's NUS University Cultural Centre, on Tuesday. Photo: Xinhua

Yale University formally opened a controversial liberal arts college in tightly governed Singapore on Tuesday, saying there was demand for “critical thinking” in the city-state and other Asian nations.

The Yale-NUS College, a joint project with the National University of Singapore, had been criticised by faculty members of the leading US university due to Singapore’s restrictions on protests and on student political activity.

“Singaporeans, and Asians more broadly, have a greater hunger for pedagogy that truly encourages critical thinking and a model of liberal arts and science education adapted for the 21st century,” Pericles Lewis, president of the college, said in a speech.

He said that “we’re not setting out to change any political discourse, but we’re giving students the tools to be active in citizenship, to think about the issues”.

“We think that a well-educated citizenry is the most important thing for any country, especially in Singapore.”

The pioneer batch of 157 students from 26 countries – 97 of them Singaporeans – was selected from a pool of over 10,000 applicants and began lessons this month in temporary facilities.

The college’s own purpose-built campus with residential facilities will open in 2015 and is designed to have a full capacity of 1,000 students.

The college is the first established by Yale outside its campus in New Haven, Connecticut.

“We believe that the college has the potential to serve as a model for others, particularly in Asia,” said NUS president Tan Chorh Chuan.

In a resolution passed in April last year, the Yale faculty expressed “concern regarding the history of lack of respect for civil and political rights in the state of Singapore”.

It called on Yale-NUS to uphold civil liberties and political freedom on campus and in broader society.

Campaign group Human Rights Watch accused Yale of “betraying the spirit of the university as a centre of open debate and protest by giving away the rights of its students” at the new campus.

“Instead of defending these rights, Yale buckled when faced with Singapore’s draconian laws on demonstrations and policies restricting student groups.”

Singapore’s education ministry said at the height of the controversy that student demonstrations on campus would require approval from the Yale-NUS administration.

Share

Tweet

1 Comments PrintEmail

For unlimited access to:

SCMP.com SCMP Tablet Edition SCMP Mobile Edition 10-year news archive Subscribe now

Existing subscribers, login here

This article is now closed to comments

JC Aug 27th 2013
10:07pm if critical thinking is absent in Singapore, do you think the city-state would have been one of the wealthiest per capita in the world, and seen by many as one of the most advanced and forward-thinking economies in the world? Another dumbass article written by self-important idiots who think the world of themselves, but look at what many of their cities have become? Either bankrupt - morally, socially, and economically - or teetering on bankruptcy.

In Case You Missed It

Germanwings co-pilot who crashed plane into Alps ‘hid illness from airline’ Chasing ghosts: Where is China’s next wave of empty ‘new towns’? INTERACTIVE: China's air pollution in 2014 British Fashion Awards Winners 2014 Closing time: How Hong Kong’s street hawkers struggle to survive Adolfo's Umbrellas - a sketch diary of the Occupy movement WIN FREE MOVIE TICKETS TO WATCH THE SPONGEBOB MOVIE Wine Circle invites you to a masterclass with Allen Meadows

Sections

Subscriptions

Classified Post

Education Post

Services

Jiu Jik

Directories

Advertising Opportunities

Events

Magazines

Connect with Us

Copyright © 2015 South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved.

Login

SCMP.com Account

or

Log in using a partner site

Log in using your Facebook account. What's this?

Login with Facebook Login with Facebook

Don't have an SCMP.com account? Subscribe Now!