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Tony Iommi: I'd Like To Remember 'Black Sabbath' As A Groundbreaking Album | Interviews @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com

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Tony Iommi: I'd Like To Remember 'Black Sabbath' As A Groundbreaking Album

artist: black sabbath date: 02/13/2010 category: hit the lights Tweet I like this 00 voted: 0

Forty years is an extremely lengthy time in general, let alone in the world of music, and much has happened since 1970 - bands have lived and bands have died, and many genres have surfaced. One of these genres to have surfaced is the following: heavy metal. Little did four Brummie gentleman know, their 1970 debut studio full length would greatly shape the rock landscape, and according to many, be responsible for giving birth to heavy metal. For four working class boys from Aston, that's quite an achievement, and certainly, it's safe to say that history will remember Black Sabbath.

UG plus: remove banner In 1968, The Polka Tulk Blues Band was formed, consisting of: vocalist John Michael ("Ozzy") Osbourne, guitarist Frank Anthony ("Tony") Iommi, bassist Terence Michael Joseph ("Geezer") Butler, and drummer William Thomas ("Bill") Ward. The Aston, Birmingham outfit shortened its name to Polka Tulk, and then revised it to Earth. Jim Simpson, owner of Henry's Blues Club, gave them gigs, and soon became their initial manager. Blues based, Earth did club performances in England, Denmark and Germany. In December 1968, Iommi left briefly to join Jethro Tull, but soon returned to the Earth fold. In 1969, Earth changed its name to what the Birmingham quartet became known as across the world: Black Sabbath.

Garnering label interest, Black Sabbath would eventually sign with Vertigo Records. Debut single "Evil Woman", a cover interpretation of a track originally cut by Minneapolis act Crow, was issued as the group's inaugural single during January 1970 on Fontana Records, and was reissued two months later by Vertigo Records. Its B-side was "Wicked World", the first composition the band had penned. Recorded on a budget of four to six hundred pounds over a single day, mixing occurred the next day with Rodger Bain producing and Tom Allom engineering. Amongst the tracks laid down was a rendition of Retaliation's "Warning", including extended soloing from Iommi.

Sabbath's eponymously titled debut came out on Friday February 13th, 1970, exactly forty years ago today, February 13th, 2010. As previously mentioned, it arguably helped to spawn what would be later known as heavy metal, and the rest, as they say, is history.

On January 14th at 14:00 GMT, Hit The Lights' Robert Gray telephoned the office of Tony Iommi's manager to be patched through for an interview to discuss the fortieth anniversary of "Black Sabbath". Battling issues with the sound, Tony Iommi cut off and called back to begin the interview.

UG: Hello?

Tony Iommi: Hello.

Can you hear me any better Tony?

Yeah, I can hear you better. Can you hear me?

Yeah, I can hear you better now. Anyway... as I was asking, how are you Tony?

Oh I'm fine thanks, yes. Busy (laughs).

Would it be alright if I began the interview?

Oh yeah. Yep.

"We used to play jazzy blues stuff before, a lot of blues songs, and then we got into writing our own tracks."

Black Sabbath formed in 1968 as The Polka Tulk Blues Band. From there, how did the group develop its sound and live performance?

I think the sound came from the guitar I suppose really, but initially the riffs... We used to play jazzy blues stuff before, a lot of blues songs, and then we got into writing our own tracks. The first one was "Wicked World", and the second one was "Black Sabbath", and as soon as those two were done we realized we got our sound: it was the Black Sabbath sound.

Was Black Sabbath's early live shows important in developing the group's sound?

I don't know. I think the sound came as soon as we started getting into writing our own songs. Your initial riffs led the way to what sound you wanted.

You made reference to "Wicked World". Was that track inspired by The Doors?

The Doors?

Yeah.

No (laughs).

One of "Wicked World"'s riffs sounds exactly like the main riff to "Wild Child" (from 1969's 'The Soft Parade').

Oh right. It certainly wouldn't have been The Doors, because I didn't like The Doors.

How did "Wicked World" come about then?

From just jamming, really, like a lot of them did. We went into a rehearsal room, and I would come up with a riff, and then everybody would join in.

Very briefly, you were a part of Jethro Tull. How did that come about?

We played a gig together, and we were supporting them. It was the night Mick Abrahams handed his notice in, and said he was leaving. They asked me if I would be interested in joining, so I said to all the rest of the guys "I've been asked if I'd be interested in joining them". They said "You should go for it", so that's what happened. I went for it, played with them by auditioning with hundreds of other guitarists, and got the job.

Why did you leave Jethro Tull after just one commitment?

I didn't feel quite as comfortable as I did. It just felt a little strange because when I joined them, I met with the manager and the manager was saying how lucky I was to be in the band. I said "Well, I'm not lucky. I'm here because I was asked to play, and you liked it". I just felt a little bit like I wanted to make it myself, instead of being given it.

How did Black Sabbath come to meet Jim Simpson, its first manager?

We played at a club in Birmingham called Henry's Blues House - it was a pub, and he used to run it. We used to play for him, and he was interested in managing us really. He saw some potential in us, and we were looking for somebody to help, and needed someone to get us gigs really. He was the one who started doing that for us.

Looking back, what was he like as a manager?

At the time, he was ok, and at the time, we didn't know any different really. He got us some work, and he helped us in the early days, so he was ok.

Following that, how did Black Sabbath come to sign a record contract with Vertigo Records?

Originally, we did some more auditions for record companies where they'd come to see us play, whether it be at Henry's Blues House or wherever. We did a couple of gigs in London for them to come and have a look, and some of them really didn't like us, and some of them did. That's really what happened. Tony Hall Enterprises were interested in signing us; he basically signed us, and we released our first album with him.

According to the liner notes for the debut album's 1996 Castle Communications reissue, it was recorded on a six hundred pound budget I believe?

It was, yeah.

Adjusted for inflation, how much would that roughly be in 2010?

Umm... God knows. I dunno. It'd be a fair whack, but it wasn't six hundred pounds. It was actually four hundred pounds I think, but at the time, it was just a very tiny studio. We only had a day to record it.

And the record label funded recording?

Yeah.

What are your memories of those recording sessions? You said the album was recorded over one day, though the 1996 reissue liner notes say the album was recorded over two days with mixing happening on the last day?

It was over two days, but the mixing was the next day and we weren't there then. We were there for the first day for recording; we just went, set our gear up, and played as we would play in a rehearsal. They miked it, taped it, and that was it really. It happened relatively quick, and then we left to go on tour in Switzerland.

Do you wish it had been that easy later on in Black Sabbath's career? To be able to just record an album in a day, and have it over and done with?

(Laughs) Yeah. I don't think it quite happens like that. With this last album we did (2009's 'The Devil You Know'), funnily enough, with the Heaven & Hell lineup, we tried to approach it the same way and have everything ready for when we go in to record. We then just laid it down, and that was very quick. We did that very quick, but we certainly didn't do it in a day.

Were there any negative aspects to recording all of the debut album's tracks in a day?

At the time, we didn't know any different. It was just like going to do a show for us; we just basically played our set, and left. Yes, I suppose there would've been negative points. You'd like to maybe try things again, but we didn't have the time. That was it. I think the only one I had the chance to play twice was "Warning"; I wanted to play another solo, and Rodger went "Oh well, we'll do it once more". That was it. It was all done very, very quick (laughs).

"Your initial riffs led the way to what sound you wanted."

(Laughs) How did Rodger Bain come to produce 'Black Sabbath'?

Rodger Bain was picked by the record company. I think it was his first project as well, that he was the new boy, and they wanted to give him us. We got on.

What did he contribute to the album's recording?

Well, I suppose he had more knowledge of what was going on than we did because we didn't know anything about the studio in them days. We had never been in a studio as far as... We'd been in demo studios, but we'd never actually been in a proper studio to record an album, so he obviously had more knowledge than us, and he knew things that we didn't. He was helpful, he was alright. He was good at the time.

Were there certain recording techniques he used to capture Black Sabbath's sound?

From what I can remember about it, it was very simplistic; a mike was stuck in front of the guitar cabinet, and then just the drums got miked up. That was it. I don't remember anything exotic.

So very no frills then?

We used a couple of effects on the album, but again, the guy that we had engineering at the time was Tom Allom. He was very good, so he helped a lot as well. He knew how to mike everything.

You mentioned effects being used on the group's debut album, and one particular effect is the rain at the start of "Black Sabbath". What inspired the group to use that rain effect at the start of that specific track?

With the actual sound of the track, it seemed like it'd be good to have that on the beginning of it, so Rodger and Tom Allom did that.

Was that stock audio, or did Rodger and Tom Allom record it themselves?

No. I think they must've found some tape in the library, and used that. I don't think we were there when they actually did that. I'm not sure. As I said, we did our part and basically, we left.

Two covers were recorded for Black Sabbath's debut album as well. Why did the group choose those two tracks in particular? Retaliation's "Warning" and Crow's "Evil Woman"?

"Evil Woman" was something chosen possibly by Jim Simpson, I think. I'm not sure; it may be him or Tony Hall who suggested we do it.

Was "Warning" one of your choices?

Yeah. "Warning" we liked; we used to like that track, and we used to play that.

"Warning" shows a lot of your bluesier side.

Yeah, well.. We had the song, and then I added the solo. It was just an off the wall jam, really. It was actually quite long when we recorded it, but Rodger cut the solo down because it got a bit long. It was probably about fifteen minutes long the solo, and so he edited it down a bit.

Is the reel containing the fifteen minute, original version of "Warning" in a vault somewhere?

It could well be, so perhaps I may find it. We didn't see those early tapes. It's a good point, actually. I might find out.

Are there any plans to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of Black Sabbath's debut album being released?

No. We haven't made any plans at all. It would be nice to actually do a couple of shows for it, but whether we will or not I don't know. Everybody seems fairly wrapped up in everything else, and also coming up is our thirtieth anniversary with (Ronnie James) Dio as well.

For 'Heaven and Hell', yeah.

Yeah (laughs).

So there are no tracks in the vault that Black Sabbath can pull out which were recorded during sessions for the group's debut?

I think we just wrote enough for the album, but there might be outtakes from the record. Otherwise, I don't know.

Would it be ok if we spoke about how some of the tracks on Black Sabbath's debut came to fruition?

Yeah, though we've not got much time. I've only got twenty minutes down.

Yeah, I know that. We have four minutes left I believe.

Ok (laughs). Umm... I can't remember exactly how they came about. As I said, the first two were "Wicked World" and "Black Sabbath". What happened usually was they waited for me to come up with a riff, so I'd come up with a riff at a rehearsal room usually, and then we'd jam on it and build the song up from there. That's really how we done most of those; we'd just go to rehearsal, and keep playing them. Again of course, there were no tape machines to tape, so we had to remember the parts - we'd have to keep playing them so we'd remember them.

Is that how "The Wizard" also came about?

Yeah. That's how they all came about; mainly, I'd play something, and then we'd build the thing up. We'd just jam around first; I'd come up with something, and everyone would go "I like that". Then we'd develop it into a song, building it up from there. Most of it came out of just jamming, really - just playing anything until something comes up that somebody liked.

When people say Black Sabbath's debut album spawned heavy metal, how do you feel?

It doesn't bother me now. I think we're classed as a heavy metal band. I always, in the early days, called ourselves heavy rock. I never knew the term "heavy metal" until later, but some people have got to put a stamp on it somewhere along the line I suppose. But that's basically what we're called now (laughs).

""Warning" we liked; we used to like that track, and we used to play that."

Is that something you're proud of then?

Well, yeah. I'm certainly proud of what we did, and whatever they wanna call it, they can call it.

Obviously, you now have forty year's worth of hindsight. How would you like Black Sabbath's debut album to be remembered?

For what it was, really. Our debut was a really groundbreaking album I think when it came out, and was a breakthrough in this type of music. Nobody was doing this stuff then, so I think it was a real breakthrough, and obviously, many years later it showed with the bands that started to follow. It was difficult to break ground then though. It was very difficult to get our music through then because it was so different, but I'd like to remember that album as a groundbreaking album (laughs).

Thanks for the interview Tony.

Thank you very much.

And give my best wishes to Ronnie as well.

I will give your best wishes to him.

We're all looking forward to seeing Heaven and Hell back out on the road, and so on - all the best with that Tony.

Thank you very much mate.

Bye.

Bye. All the best.

Interview by Robert Gray
Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2010

POSTED: 02/13/2010 - 06:48 am print share • Music Interviews • Comments • Black Sabbath Interviews subscribe to Other Black Sabbath interviews: + Black Sabbath: It Was Like Four Friends Together Exploring The World interviews 05/28/2010 + Rock Chronicles. 1980s: Tony Iommi rock chronicles 03/08/2008 + Geezer Butler: Bringing The Dio Era Back interviews 07/25/2007 comments policy  77  comments posted, 4 removed | this article is 95% spam-free   reply
DrPooh
posted on Feb 13, 2010 06:54 am  #    Iommi is such a win, great interview.   reply
Rakatung
posted on Feb 13, 2010 07:09 am  #    Nobnobnob2 wrote:

Black sabbath is over-rated.

oh wow, you're so edgy!
i bet if you had friends they'd think you were super cool!
  reply

masteryan
posted on Feb 13, 2010 07:52 am  #    I'24 and think you're a tool.

I love black sabbath. And yes,that includes the tony martin era.
  reply

USCENDONE BENE
posted on Feb 13, 2010 07:53 am  #    Even if you think a band sucks, when it comes to one like Sabbath you should show a bit of respect as im sure there will be atleast one band you like who would list them as an influence to their sound. A lot of heavier rock music since this album owes a lot to it   reply
Conformist
posted on Feb 13, 2010 08:00 am  #    Oh shut your mouth. Its my opinion. If i think the band sucks, ill say so. But im not really surprised i immediatley get flammed. Its UG. Bunch of ignorant 15 year olds who think they are cool for liking the "classics". Get bent. Tool.

U mad? You could have done better fail troll.
Be nice to the attention seeking troll ppl.

Gd interview =]   reply

Diamond Dave
posted on Feb 13, 2010 08:01 am  #    sabbath was only good with ozzy IMO

some of those tracks are unreal, NIB, Children of the Grave, etc I love that shit   reply

the_hoodster
posted on Feb 13, 2010 08:26 am  #    Nobnobnob2 wrote:

Black sabbath is over-rated.

Are you sure you didn't just read that on one of those MSN's Top 10 things and have now decided to voice that as your own opinion?   reply

vultures?OMG
posted on Feb 13, 2010 08:28 am  #    Their best album =)

Iommi always seems like a really laid-back guy in interviews.   reply

ChucklesMginty
posted on Feb 13, 2010 08:45 am  #    I should really listen to more early Sabbath.
When I first heard Iron Man it absolutely blew me away.   reply
PlayFreebirdNow
posted on Feb 13, 2010 08:58 am  #    Iommi is so awesome.   reply
Galvatron
posted on Feb 13, 2010 09:15 am  #    Its metals birthday today.

You have got to love some Ozzy era Black Sabbath.   reply

Heilz
posted on Feb 13, 2010 09:22 am  #    ChucklesMginty wrote:

I should really listen to more early Sabbath.
When I first heard Iron Man it absolutely blew me away.

I say ditto on the last part. First time i heard sabbath it was just like godly s*x 0,0   reply

Kankuro1
posted on Feb 13, 2010 09:47 am  #    First time i heard War Pigs, I about died. Amazing song, amazing band.   reply
Charlie4
posted on Feb 13, 2010 09:57 am  #    Mr Iommi, calling it groundbreaking is an understatement, your album changed the world for millions...   reply
Jyrgen
posted on Feb 13, 2010 09:58 am  #    Iommi is one of my favourite guitarists. Good interview!   reply
cobracarg
posted on Feb 13, 2010 10:22 am  #    iommi...the king of metal riffing!!!!! all hail   reply
Törö
posted on Feb 13, 2010 11:11 am  #    I actually happened to listen to this album at the same time I noticed this interview.   reply
ufm_shamrock
posted on Feb 13, 2010 11:57 am  #    Great Interview.   reply
muffinduck01
posted on Feb 13, 2010 12:39 pm  #    A god amongst man...   reply
flame_mc
posted on Feb 13, 2010 12:41 pm  #    Noobnoobnoob2 wrote:

Black sabbath is over-rated.

I think that that name suits you better.
Anyway, Iommi is the man, everytime that I look his fingers I say '' man, how lucky I am''   reply

Belsebubb93
posted on Feb 13, 2010 12:54 pm  #    Black Sabbath Ozzy Era is the most awsome line up and songs but Dio era is also good

I like songs on ozzy era like
Spiral Architecht
Snowblind
Never Say Die
Thrill of it all
Children of the grave
The Wizard
Sweet Leaf
etc...Awesome songs   reply

Zogman
posted on Feb 13, 2010 01:28 pm  #    vultures?OMG wrote:

Their best album =)

Iommi always seems like a really laid-back guy in interviews.

He seems laid back all the time, in the concert vids i've seen he's just there doing his own thing and ****in' enjoying himself   reply

oneblackened
posted on Feb 13, 2010 01:33 pm  #    Zogman wrote:

vultures?OMG wrote:

Their best album =)

Iommi always seems like a really laid-back guy in interviews.

He seems laid back all the time, in the concert vids i've seen he's just there doing his own thing and ****in' enjoying himself

I would agree with that. He's the epitome of "**** you, I just wanna play my guitar."   reply

gerardk
posted on Feb 13, 2010 02:37 pm  #    Short interview!:o
Iommi seems like a good guy.
I hope they play some shows to celebrate 40 yrs of heavy metal!!   reply
DrFrankenstrat
posted on Feb 13, 2010 03:01 pm  #    Nobnobnob2 :
Black sabbath is over-rated.

you're over-rated   reply

Ronok1307
posted on Feb 13, 2010 03:29 pm  #    Tony Iommi's one of my favourite guitartists. i love the riffs in the early albums. both ozzy and dio line-ups are awesome.   reply
Ronok1307
posted on Feb 13, 2010 03:31 pm  #    *guitarists

oops, too sleepy.   reply

de-fexxx666
posted on Feb 13, 2010 04:05 pm  #    Classic album (Though IMO nothing they've done can touch The Mob Rules). Iommi is one of the classiest guys in metal, always great to read his interviews.   reply
xHellbound
posted on Feb 13, 2010 04:10 pm  #    Happy birthday, heavy metal! Long live Tony Iommi!

I hope they release some of the extra recordings from their first album. I would love to hear Warning in its entirety, it has some of the greatest solo'ing ever.

And on a side note, get better Dio!!   reply

duncang
  m   posted on Feb 13, 2010 04:29 pm  #    Checked.   reply
BillytheGreatSG
posted on Feb 13, 2010 05:27 pm  #    Nobnobnob2 You got to show a bit of respect here you ignorant pig.... Just think that the bands you like to listen to wouldn't even exist if it weren't for them....   reply
BillytheGreatSG
posted on Feb 13, 2010 05:28 pm  #    Nobnobnob2 wrote:

Black sabbath is over-rated.
You got to show a bit of respect here you ignorant pig.... Just think that the bands you like to listen to wouldn't even exist if it weren't for them....
  reply

DanBourne
posted on Feb 13, 2010 05:45 pm  #    xHellbound wrote:

Happy birthday, heavy metal! Long live Tony Iommi!

I hope they release some of the extra recordings from their first album. I would love to hear Warning in its entirety, it has some of the greatest solo'ing ever.

And on a side note, get better Dio!!

Agreed totally!! I just listened to warning again....it is epic!!! i want to hear the full Version!!

Black Sabbath i think did their best songs with Ozzy, He just has a Unique voice (as does Dio) but Dio is Dio and Ozzy is Ozzy!!   reply

Himelnator
posted on Feb 13, 2010 06:24 pm  #    happy 40th anniversary Sabbath! and happy 30th Heaven and Hell, Sabbaths best   reply
BlitzkriegAir
posted on Feb 13, 2010 07:00 pm  #    the master of the heavy metal riff
Iommi is my favorite guitarist   reply
ginger ninja102
posted on Feb 13, 2010 08:01 pm  #    Kankuro1 wrote:

First time i heard War Pigs, I about died. Amazing song, amazing band. hell yeah the first time i heard it i was like ok not bad alright HOLY DUMP PUK THIS IS FECKING AWSOME   reply

ginger ninja102
posted on Feb 13, 2010 08:02 pm  #    also i wonder how dio is going with his stomach cancer???   reply
ippystratman
posted on Feb 13, 2010 08:30 pm  #    Belsebubb93 wrote:

Black Sabbath Ozzy Era is the most awsome line up and songs but Dio era is also good

I like songs on ozzy era like
Spiral Architecht
Snowblind
Never Say Die
Thrill of it all
Children of the grave
The Wizard
Sweet Leaf
etc...Awesome songs

I thought never say die was Dio. I might be wrong I can't remember now. Sabbath are amazing, Toni Iommi's riffs are amazing although im not a huge fan of his lead work. I don't think Ronnie Dio gets enough credit though to be honest, whenever you read something about Black Sabbath, pretty much all that ever gets talked about is the first two albums. People are gonna have a rage when I say this but Dio was technically a far better singer than Ozzy as much as I do love Ozzy's voice. I can't stand people like my little brother who say Ozzy Osbourne was Black Sabbath and they never did anything good after he left. Ozzy got fired coz he let the band down once too often. He was easily the most iconic frontman of that era even though he couldn't really sing too good but I think it must of been so hard for Dio to replace him because he was so adored by all the fans and they didn't want anyone else singing. He would of probably had so many death threats, he even got one from Ozzy so I give him credit for actually manage to pull it off   reply

queenslander47
posted on Feb 13, 2010 09:26 pm  #    Nobnobnob2 wrote:

Black sabbath is over-rated.

Ladies and gentlemen. We have ourselves a TROLL!

**** off   reply

Smitty370
posted on Feb 13, 2010 09:43 pm  #    Black Sabbath is the best band ever, loved all era's, not many bands have survived this long, anyways happy bday black sabbath /,,/   reply
IbanezIceman09
posted on Feb 13, 2010 09:52 pm  #    Black Sabbath "Black Sabbath" the birth of Metal.....   reply
Black Ox
posted on Feb 13, 2010 11:03 pm  #    Snowblind is so good   reply
Zeerion
posted on Feb 14, 2010 12:29 am  #    tony is the reason i play guitar. if i saw him in person i would bow down to his awesomeness   reply
thewickerman512
posted on Feb 14, 2010 12:53 am  #    Love this band man, I can still remember the first time I listened to the title track off this album. Sent chills down my spine and blew me away. No matter what time of the day, no matter what mood i'm in, I can always listen to Sabbath.   reply
Draken68
posted on Feb 14, 2010 01:18 am  #    Nobnobnob2 wrote:

Black sabbath is over-rated.

thats an extremely ignorant and idiotic statement...they started a whole genre and everything about them was fantastic...tonys guitar riffs and solos are some of the most memorable in music and ozzys vocals and lyrics are great too...geezer and bill were also very good   reply

Force Reaver
posted on Feb 14, 2010 02:05 am  #    Nobnobnob2 wrote:

Black sabbath is over-rated.

Yea I suppose your right. Your band has definitely influenced millions of more bands then sabbath could ever hope to. What was the name of your band again? Oh yea..... thats right..... Now go eat the dinner that mommy has made you before it gets cold. Then you can go back down into your basement to troll some more.   reply

KilleyeWill
posted on Feb 14, 2010 02:34 am  #    I love the fact that no mater what any new age bands or regular everyday people say or do, (even in different types of music) they can not say to much about bands like Sabbath. Sabbath will be around allot longer, I bet my life on it. 30 years later they are still requested and respected. you really can not say that about allot of bands after the 80's. Hell the Beatles or Led Zep can still put out a "Best of" collection and hit #1 for a couple of weeks (and do not say that most bands today are not judged on sales, it's a god dam fact that they are). That shit says allot if your 30 plus years ago on your career. And I know Black Sabbath falls in that category, they are legendary. When all your Nicklebacks and Kid Rocks and your Lady Gagas have their moment there will still be bands like Black Sabbath and even the people that influenced them. It was just better, more talented music. It will be in a dam time capsule before any new band out there..well that's it....DONE! \m/   reply
nick_b
posted on Feb 14, 2010 03:51 am  #    Nobnobnob2 wrote:

Black sabbath is over-rated.
pathetic troll attempt is pathetic.
Iommi sounds like an incredible guy. 40 years on and the master's writing killer riff after killer riff.   reply

nick_b
posted on Feb 14, 2010 03:52 am  #    *still writing, sorry.   reply
FattMikE
posted on Feb 14, 2010 08:18 am  #    KilleyeWill wrote:

I love the fact that no mater what any new age bands or regular everyday people say or do, (even in different types of music) they can not say to much about bands like Sabbath. Sabbath will be around allot longer, I bet my life on it. 30 years later they are still requested and respected. you really can not say that about allot of bands after the 80's. Hell the Beatles or Led Zep can still put out a "Best of" collection and hit #1 for a couple of weeks (and do not say that most bands today are not judged on sales, it's a god dam fact that they are). That shit says allot if your 30 plus years ago on your career. And I know Black Sabbath falls in that category, they are legendary. When all your Nicklebacks and Kid Rocks and your Lady Gagas have their moment there will still be bands like Black Sabbath and even the people that influenced them. It was just better, more talented music. It will be in a dam time capsule before any new band out there..well that's it....DONE! \m/

'Nuff Said   reply

devilex121
posted on Feb 14, 2010 09:38 am  #    Nobnobnob2 wrote:

Black sabbath is over-rated.
pff... so why 'd you come to diss on them? :@   reply

JoePerry4life
posted on Feb 14, 2010 12:01 pm  #    ippystratman wrote:

Belsebubb93 wrote:

Black Sabbath Ozzy Era is the most awsome line up and songs but Dio era is also good

I like songs on ozzy era like
Spiral Architecht
Snowblind
Never Say Die
Thrill of it all
Children of the grave
The Wizard
Sweet Leaf
etc...Awesome songs

I thought never say die was Dio. I might be wrong I can't remember now. Sabbath are amazing, Toni Iommi's riffs are amazing although im not a huge fan of his lead work. I don't think Ronnie Dio gets enough credit though to be honest, whenever you read something about Black Sabbath, pretty much all that ever gets talked about is the first two albums. People are gonna have a rage when I say this but Dio was technically a far better singer than Ozzy as much as I do love Ozzy's voice. I can't stand people like my little brother who say Ozzy Osbourne was Black Sabbath and they never did anything good after he left. Ozzy got fired coz he let the band down once too often. He was easily the most iconic frontman of that era even though he couldn't really sing too good but I think it must of been so hard for Dio to replace him because he was so adored by all the fans and they didn't want anyone else singing. He would of probably had so many death threats, he even got one from Ozzy so I give him credit for actually manage to pull it off

+1, I prefer the dio years of sabbath.   reply

lefty311
posted on Feb 14, 2010 12:03 pm  #    why does UG put the very beginning of answering the phone on the interview? no other publications do it for a reason... ITS UNNECESSARY!   reply
Robert Gray
posted on Feb 14, 2010 12:09 pm  #    lefty311 wrote:

why does UG put the very beginning of answering the phone on the interview? no other publications do it for a reason... ITS UNNECESSARY!
For the record, UG doesn't do it - I do it, and it occurs on interviews I do for UG specifically. I do it so people can see the entire conversation for themselves and draw their own conclusions, so that they know nothing is cherry-picked as is the case with most interviews around.

If you don't like the pleasantries at the beginning, just scroll down to where the interview begins and avoid it - simple as that. I don't see your problem.   reply

FearOfTheDuck
posted on Feb 14, 2010 12:23 pm  #    Groundbreaking band! The first 10 years anyway. Music owes a lot to them!   reply
Warehouse
posted on Feb 14, 2010 12:44 pm  #    Love Sabbath, but is it just me or does Iommi kinda seem condescending in this interview?   reply
motor03
posted on Feb 14, 2010 01:07 pm  #    I think it's cause he keeps saying "like I said earlier.." that's kind of condescending. I've seen live interviews and lessons he has given on youtube and he seems like an overall good guy. Plus he's like what, 80? probably has an enlarged prostate which could make anyone kinda cranky.
He is the reason I picked up the guitar in the first place. The more I pay attention, the more I see how many riffs and ideas that are being created today seem like some variation on something he already did. I was just playing outshined and the opening riff is something he probably played at some point. Know what I mean?   reply
korbhag
posted on Feb 14, 2010 01:50 pm  #    Great interview again! Don't cut anything from them Robert, some people do like the intro part!   reply
jp_cheif
posted on Feb 14, 2010 02:11 pm  #    Awesomeness. Sabbath is truly the crown of metal and Iommi is a god. Great interview.   reply
Robert Gray
posted on Feb 14, 2010 02:15 pm  #    korbhag wrote:

Great interview again! Don't cut anything from them Robert, some people do like the intro part!
That's great to hear, and I'm glad you enjoyed the interview.   reply

"Tele" Steve
posted on Feb 14, 2010 03:14 pm  #    lefty311 wrote:

why does UG put the very beginning of answering the phone on the interview? no other publications do it for a reason... ITS UNNECESSARY!

Honestly, I agree. As someone with a journalism degree it makes me cringe a bit. But anyway, always good to hear from the father of heavy metal.   reply

Warheart1188
posted on Feb 14, 2010 05:58 pm  #    When I was around 9 years old, I heard the first Sabbath album and loved it. I used to think Iommi had magic fingers because he would always have 2(+) lead guitar tracks playing solos at once and, being a kid, I thought his fingers were flying everywhere.   reply
Chozodragon
posted on Feb 14, 2010 07:17 pm  #    Iommi.

  reply

kodadak
posted on Feb 14, 2010 08:07 pm  #    why can't other rock stars be as humble as Iommi, imagine how non-suck the industry would be if all band members were as chill as him   reply
DeDperson
posted on Feb 14, 2010 09:05 pm  #    see, Ozzy era Sabbath was hands down, the best. Dio as an independent artist was better though. AND, I'd say Masters of Reality is most definetly their best album.   reply
Othersider
posted on Feb 14, 2010 09:28 pm  #    Tony   reply
AstheticsOfHate
posted on Feb 14, 2010 10:22 pm  #    Rob's interviews are always top notch! Happy Birthday Sabbath!   reply
modirnwarfare
posted on Feb 14, 2010 11:20 pm  #    Ozzy Osbourne, Geezer Butler, Tony Iommi, and Bill Ward. Who can deny the legends that they are. Amazing. I thought nobody could surpass the greatness that Tony Iommi is. Then came Randy Rhoads!

Tony Iommi created metal and revolutionized music.

Randy Rhoads (even though he didn't like Sabbath) took what Tony gave him, and revolutionized music again.

I just wish I was alive to see all this happen before my very own eyes.....
  reply

NShore
posted on Feb 15, 2010 02:25 am  #    "Tele" Steve wrote:

lefty311 wrote:

why does UG put the very beginning of answering the phone on the interview? no other publications do it for a reason... ITS UNNECESSARY!

Honestly, I agree. As someone with a journalism degree it makes me cringe a bit. But anyway, always good to hear from the father of heavy metal.

Coming from a Journalism perspective, I'd tend to agree with this. But speaking as a music fan, I've often found myself looking for a complete transcription out of frustration with incomplete or out of context excerpts and quotations. In that respect I have to say I appreciate what Rob's trying to do.   reply

Xpl0de
posted on Feb 15, 2010 03:08 am  #    DrFrankenstrat wrote:

Nobnobnob2 :
Black sabbath is over-rated.

you're over-rated

Oh no he di'ent!!   reply

Robert Gray
posted on Feb 15, 2010 04:42 am  #    AstheticsOfHate wrote:

Rob's interviews are always top notch! Happy Birthday Sabbath!
Thanks man - much appreciated.   reply

TheSilverBeatle
posted on Feb 17, 2010 07:22 pm  #    Decent interview, seems like you should interviewed the engineer instead, you kept asking questions about the recording process and Tony really didn't have much to say...I mean they recorded it a day and got out of there, I mean sure asking about the rain effects and stuff is interesting but you probably would have got better answers out of the people who actually did that aspect of the record and spent more time asking Tony about the songs. It seemed like he was just trying to be nice and give you answers when you asked about things like the recording engineer and what not.

Adjusted for inflation, how much would that roughly be in 2010?

Umm... God knows. I dunno. It'd be a fair whack, but it wasn't six hundred pounds. It was actually four hundred pounds I think, but at the time, it was just a very tiny studio. We only had a day to record it.

Maybe it's just me but that seemed like a silly question to ask him...like what is he going to say? Uh...let me bust out my calculator and a chart comparing inflation rates and find out for you.

I'm not trying to insult you or anything, just a little constructive criticism, I've read a lot of great interviews from you on this site and I can't say I don't envy you for being able to talk to some amazing musicians!   reply

Robert Gray
posted on Feb 18, 2010 02:01 pm  #    TheSilverBeatle wrote:

Decent interview, seems like you should interviewed the engineer instead, you kept asking questions about the recording process and Tony really didn't have much to say...I mean they recorded it a day and got out of there, I mean sure asking about the rain effects and stuff is interesting but you probably would have got better answers out of the people who actually did that aspect of the record and spent more time asking Tony about the songs. It seemed like he was just trying to be nice and give you answers when you asked about things like the recording engineer and what not.

Adjusted for inflation, how much would that roughly be in 2010?

Umm... God knows. I dunno. It'd be a fair whack, but it wasn't six hundred pounds. It was actually four hundred pounds I think, but at the time, it was just a very tiny studio. We only had a day to record it.

Maybe it's just me but that seemed like a silly question to ask him...like what is he going to say? Uh...let me bust out my calculator and a chart comparing inflation rates and find out for you.

I'm not trying to insult you or anything, just a little constructive criticism, I've read a lot of great interviews from you on this site and I can't say I don't envy you for being able to talk to some amazing musicians!
I can understand your sentiments about speaking to the engineer instead, though truth be told, I'm not sure how many people would read that as opposed to an interview with say Tony or whomever. I'm speaking from experience here - for example, if this was an interview with Ozzy Osbourne, this would've got even more views and comments than this. You'd have people commenting "Why is he interviewing the engineer?".

As for asking about the songs, I did actually try to if you notice; his answer was they started with a riff and went from there. We all have to take into account this was forty years ago, and memories fade. Besides, Tony isn't much of a talker anyway - interviewed him before.   reply

pineaple expres
posted on Feb 22, 2010 03:03 pm  #    [quote]devilex121 wrote:

Nobnobnob2 wrote:

Black sabbath is over-rated.

omg u r an rtard. sabbath kicks all ass and always wil evn after all of them die. theyre like the shakespeare of music the guys been dead for 2or 300 years and is stil the most popular writer. itll b the same for sabbath   reply

JO MAMA/BASS
posted on Feb 26, 2010 07:05 pm  #    [quote]Conformist wrote:

Oh shut your mouth. Its my opinion. If i think the band sucks, ill say so. But im not really surprised i immediatley get flammed. Its UG. Bunch of ignorant 15 year olds who think they are cool for liking the "classics". Get bent. Tool.

somebody get this guy some midal   reply

Madnesshero
posted on May 14, 2010 03:31 pm  #    JO MAMA/BASS wrote:

[quote]Conformist wrote:

Oh shut your mouth. Its my opinion. If i think the band sucks, ill say so. But im not really surprised i immediatley get flammed. Its UG. Bunch of ignorant 15 year olds who think they are cool for liking the "classics". Get bent. Tool.

somebody get this guy some midal
Man show some respect. This band is one of the bests ever. Tommi Iommi is a master and he created a lot of grat riffs and solos. If you don't like them then you don't like the metal. And, a lot of 15 year guitarists and bassists know a lot much more stuff than you on the music. Tommi you're a god!!!   reply

radicaldookie
posted on Jun 01, 2010 10:40 pm  #    any metalhead knows Iommi is a God... © 2012 Ultimate-Guitar.com or its affiliates. All rights reserved     About | Help | Site Map | Link To Us | TOS | Privacy Policy | Advertise | Contact Ad Blocking software message! Dear UG User,

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