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All-Energy - renewable energy, green energy, clean energy

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[email protected] - Issue 150 - Mid-September 2009


[email protected] is brought to you free of charge every two weeks by Media Generation Events Ltd, organisers of All-Energy, the UK’s largest renewable energy exhibition and conference – [web.archive.org]

The inaugural ‘sister’ show, All-Energy Australia, is being staged in Melbourne, Australia on 7-8 October this year. [web.archive.org]  Like All-Energy in Aberdeen, it features a free-to attend conference.  The full programme featuring 100+/- speakers is at [web.archive.org], the exhibitor list is at [web.archive.org], and you can register free of charge at [web.archive.org]

See you at WATTS! Yes, the UK events season is well under way; and All-Energy representatives will be at several key events this autumn including WATTS, BWEA31 and BHA’s annual conference as well as SRF events including the Green Awards. The WATTS conference – the Wave and Tidal Technology Symposium – organised by REA is being held on Tuesday this week with David Kidney, Energy and Climate Change Minister as a keynote speaker. There is still time to register.  See you there! [web.archive.org]

Feel free to pass [email protected] on to colleagues, who can subscribe by emailing [email protected] with “subscribe” in the subject line and full contact details in the message. Back issues can be found at [web.archive.org] – use the pull down box to find the previous news-packed 149 issues. You can keep in touch with news on a daily basis through our newsfeeds reached via the homepage at [web.archive.org]. Remember to let us know of your news, and provide the web links to stories you would like to see included future issues.

Footnote from Editor Judith Patten. Thank you for your good wishes for my sponsored 450ft abseil to raise funds for the Anthony Nolan Trust (my son is shortly to have a bone marrow transplant). I’ve done it! Picture at [web.archive.org] (it will remain there for 7 days/100 downloads). And yes, I would still appreciate sponsorship! [web.archive.org]

CONTENTS

1. GENERAL – UK NEWS

1.1. Ed Miliband wants your input

1.2. Green groups urge joint action

1.3. Scotland unveils world's first carbon budget

1.4. Regional CO2 emissions results released

1.5. All councils must get serious about CO2

1.6. Ground-breaking Carbon Trust report

1.7. Low carbon opportunities for graduates

1.8. Masdar keen for Scottish universities link

1.9. SNP looks to EU for energy help

1.10. Future Capital Partners appointment

1.11. UK's future skills shortage

1.12. Wood hits the sustainable energy trail

1.13. Nominations for SRF Green Energy Awards

1.14. Regen SW Green Energy Awards

2. GENERAL – INTERNATIONAL NEWS

2.1. California 33% RPS by 2020

2.2. Australia's ASX to launch RE futures

2.3. Norway's oil money flooding into green shares

2.4. Green energy on a roll, but …..

2.5. Europe’s 30 ‘smart cities’

2.6. Masdar Institute to get $1.2b funds

2.7. World's first green university

2.8. Searching for energy ideas

2.9. Shell’s Voser sees time as top RE challenge

2.10. World Bank spends US$ 3.3bn on RE fund

3. GRID AND TRANSMISSION

3.1. Restructuring of Ofgem

3.2. Grid plan for North Sea unveiled

3.3. Planners approve Ireland Wales link

3.4. Where is the will to power?

3.5. The roll out of smart meters

4. WIND – UK NEWS (See also Onsite section)

4.1. World’s biggest wind turbine blades

4.2. Welcomed by FoE

4.3. Caithness windfarm fatality

4.4. First power from Robin Rigg

4.5. New quango - change to rural Britain

4.6. Wind firm invests £1.23m and doubles jobs

4.7. Contractor dives into marine renewables

4.8. UK's first 'pure-play' offshore wind co.

4.9. Sheringham Shoal - Newt safety assured

4.10. Wind farm threat to Red Kites

4.11. H&W’s new wind turbines deal

4.12. Govt urged to help access wind loans

4.13. Work begins on Arecleoch

4.14. Expansion for Kilbraur wind farm

4.15. Gust of good news for Quayle Munro

4.16. Falck’s HQ moves to Inverness

4.17. Fishermen seek compensation

4.18. Wind farm battle to go to High Court

4.19. BWEA31: Building an industry

5. WIND – INTERNATIONAL NEWS

5.1. World's biggest offshore windfarm launched

5.2. SSE’s Swedish wind joint venture

5.3. German wind farms approved

5.4. Wind - 17% of EU's electricity by 2030

5.5. Vestas launches new offshore turbine

5.6. BP sells Indian wind assets

5.7. GE Indian wind turbine plant

5.8. Inauguration of Hywind floating wind turbine

6. WAVE AND TIDAL

6.1. Funding boost for MCT and Pelamis

6.2. World’s first commercial tidal energy scheme

6.3. Barrage and road dualling are ‘key’ – Hain

6.4. Obama’s ocean task force releases report

6.5. S.Africa – big wave project investigation

6.6. Ocean energy developments

6.7. Impact of RE on oceans must be investigated

6.8. TAG on the crest of a wave

6.9. Tests of tidal generators approved

6.10. Tidal devices to be put to the test

6.11. Study on Alternative to Severn Barrage

6.12. WATTS 2009

7. BIOENERGY (See also Sustainable Transport)

7.1. One stop shop for anaerobic digestion info

7.2. ‘Flagship’ biomass plant opens

7.3. Strong protest over biomass plant

7.4. European farming’s aim

7.5. Pigs produce crackling of electricity

7.6. Bioenergy 09

8. HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELLS (See also Sustainable Transport)

8.1. Scotland hydrogen plans welcomed

8.2. £7.2 million for HFC Demo programme

9. HYDROPOWER

9.1. China hydropower to near double by 2020

9.2. Six turbines to be built anew at Siberian plant

9.3. Water power for 350 Lakes homes

9.4. The BHA Annual Conference

10. LOW CARBON BUILDINGS, MICROGENERATION, ONSITE RENEWABLES AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY

10.1. Brits want new homes with cheap energy

10.2. Wind turbines at Haverigg Prison?

10.3. Coal Authority working with PfR

10.4. Railwind concept project launched

10.5. CHP – small is beautiful

10.6. 2m homes helped by Warm Front

10.7. Planning blamed for Windsave liquidation

10.8. Scots taking interest in home RE

10.9. Sustainable cities are the solution

10.10. Smart Energy - focus on decentralised energy

11. SOLAR

11.1. EU States shine a light on PV barriers

11.2. REA role in PV LEGAL

11.3. Google’s solar plans

12. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT

12.1. Government loan for electric car maker

12.2. Marine fuel cell project passes a milestone

12.3. GM rolls past 1 million miles in fuel cell demo

12.4. Germany - nationwide hydrogen fuel network by 2015

12.5. U.S. House considers green vehicle R&D

12.6. Bike to the future

12.7. US soy drops off?

13. CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE

13.1. Siemens and E.ON team up for CCS

13.2. CCS, nuclear in carbon markets – IEA call

13.3. Clean Coal and Carbon Capture and Storage

14. NUCLEAR

14.1. UKAEA privatised in Babcock sale

14.2. Rolls Royce support EDF nuclear plans

15. KEEPING IN TOUCH

15.1. All-Energy daily newsfeeds

15.2. ‘Energy’ the All-Energy official publication

1. GENERAL – UK NEWS

1.1. Ed Miliband wants your input

“I get a lot of suggestions for what should be top of our list in tackling climate change. Three of the things I'm pushed on most regularly are the Prime Minister attending Copenhagen to help deliver a deal, doing more to provide home insulation in the UK and more government support to create green jobs. Clearly these are all important but what would be top of your list?[Note: clicking to vote is not obvious – just click on the line that says ‘Vote and see results so far’] [web.archive.org]

1.2. Green groups urge joint action

Eight of the UK's leading environmental groups have joined forces to urge political parties to adopt a joint approach on green issues. They have produced a 10-point checklist of policies which they say are essential if the UK is to help protect the local and global environment. The list includes a large investment in energy production and green transport. It also calls for an end to airport expansion and a nationwide housing re-fit to boost energy efficiency. [web.archive.org]

1.3. Scotland unveils world's first carbon budget

Scotland unveiled the world's first "carbon budget" to link greenhouse gas emissions with government spending, revealing that its plans will emit the equivalent of four coal-fired power stations next year. The Scottish government has estimated that its spending next year on £33bn worth of core services such as hospitals, schools, roads, local government and farming, will lead to the release of 11.5m tonnes of carbon dioxide. The "carbon budget" is being claimed as another world first by ministers in Edinburgh, after the Scottish parliament set the first legally binding CO2 reductions target of 42% by 2020 in a climate act in June. The UK Treasury has no plans to follow suit but officials in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs are closely watching the Scottish government's efforts. [web.archive.org]

1.4. Regional CO2 emissions results released

New climate change stats revealing the carbon footprint of every single part of the UK are published today (17 September). The statistics calculate the climate impact of the energy used by homes, businesses and road transport in each local authority area throughout England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland. The UK has already reduced its emissions by 21% on 1990 levels and is committed to a reduction of at least 34% by 2020 -- In today’s results the UK’s overall CO2 emissions dropped by2% between 2005 and 2007 -- Emissions have fallen in 335 out of the 434 local authorities in the UK. [web.archive.org]

1.5. All councils must get serious about CO2

Responding to new climate change stats revealing the carbon footprint of every local council in the country, Friends of the Earth's Senior Climate Campaigner Tony Bosworth said: "These new statistics highlight the need for every local authority to get serious about tackling climate change. Councils have a big say in how we heat and power our homes and how we get around. While carbon emissions have fallen in the majority of council areas, they have actually risen in others and most councils could do far more to cut emissions.” [web.archive.org]

1.6. Ground-breaking Carbon Trust report

A ground-breaking new report by the Carbon Trust has, for the first time, clearly quantified the risks and opportunities for UK businesses based on how they respond to climate change. According to Bruce Duguid, Head of Investor Engagement at the Carbon Trust, “Climate change has the potential to create and destroy huge amounts of value for all industries – research by the Carbon Trust suggests up to 65% of value could be placed at risk in some sectors, but others could achieve up to an 80% value creation opportunity.” In no area is this contrast more apparent than within carbon trading and its related sectors such as carbon offsetting, carbon project development and the world of carbon finance. [web.archive.org]

1.7. Low carbon opportunities for graduates

Low carbon vehicle and marine energy industries are to benefit from a new placement scheme that will see more talented graduates enter this key sector, putting their new skills to use while gaining vital career experience. Speaking at the UUK conference David Lammy announced the creation of the Low Carbon Future Leaders placement scheme, a Backing Young Britain initiative that will give 1,500 graduates the opportunity to work and gain paid work experience in a sector that will be providing the jobs for the future. Graduates will work with businesses to help raise awareness of technological developments and new business opportunities while gaining work experience in these emerging industries. [web.archive.org]

1.8. Masdar keen for Scottish universities link

The vice president of the world’s first dedicated alternative and ­sustainable energy technology school, the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, has called on Scottish universities and would-be students to come to Abu Dhabi to study at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology-affiliated institution.  On a visit to the UK, Dr Tariq Ali, an Edinburgh University graduate and a former director of Imperial College London, said that the Masdar Institute, the $1.2bn centrepiece of the oil-rich emirate’s futuristic $15bn renewable and alternative energy-based Masdar City, was seeking academic links with Scottish institutions such as Aberdeen University, Strathclyde, and Heriot Watt. [web.archive.org]

1.9. SNP looks to EU for energy help

The European Commission is being called upon to act against the UK Government over alleged "discrimination" against renewable energy in Scotland. Scottish National Party MEP Alyn Smith said electricity producers have to pay more the further away they are from the South East of England. He has tabled questions about the issue in the European Parliament. But UK energy regulator Ofgem said there was no evidence the charging model was hurting the renewable sector. [web.archive.org]

1.10. Future Capital Partners appointment

Future Capital Partners has announced the appointment of Trevor Castledine as its new chief operating officer. Castledine is the former managing director and head of financial products at Royal Bank of Scotland. Castledine will be responsible for overseeing all of the firm’s operations, organisational development and strategy delivery. Future Capital Partners launched in 2000 and currently has £6bn of assets under management. The firm specialises in alternative investments such as renewable energy, international property, biotechnology and media and entertainment. [web.archive.org]

1.11. UK's future skills shortage

The U.K. faces a future skills shortage in engineering that if not addressed could have a damaging impact on its transition to a low-carbon economy, a report by U.K. oil and gas network operator National Grid PLC (NGG) said. Engineering as a career is undervalued and undermined by outdated stereotypes and is seen as a less attractive option for young people, teachers and parents than other professions, the report "Engineering Our Future" found. However, as many older personnel are due to retire over the coming years, the power sector is facing a growing need for more engineering graduates to work on the transition to a low carbon economy, including the revitalization of the nation's power station fleet and upgrading the grid infrastructure. The skills shortage in the nuclear industry, which is currently experiencing a revival, is particularly acute. [web.archive.org]

1.12. Wood hits the sustainable energy trail

Not many months ago, Aberdeen’s largest indigenous energy services player, the Wood Group, launched a subsidiary dedicated to renewable energy and upped the commitment to growing its already substantial involvement to carbon capture, including examining and seeking to cut the size of its own carbon footprint. Mike Straughen, chief executive of engineering for Wood Group, likens the company’s decision to engage with the world of sustainable energy to the decision taken some 40 years go to seek business in the then new North Sea offshore industry. At that time, the Wood family’s stock in trade was the fishing industry. [web.archive.org]

1.13. Nominations for SRF Green Energy Awards

Projects celebrating Scotland’s achievements in tackling climate change are being invited to put themselves forward for the 2009 Green Energy Awards. The awards will be presented at a gala evening in the run down to the Copenhagen Climate Change summit in December, showcasing just how Scotland’s world leading climate change target is being met from clean and green renewable energy. All-Energy is proud to be the sponsor of the ‘Best New Business’ Award. [web.archive.org]

1.14. Regen SW Green Energy Awards

Regen SW holds annual green energy awards to celebrate the achievements of individuals, community groups, renewable energy companies, housing developers, and local authorities in furthering the development of renewable energy in South West England. There’s less than a week in which to make your nominations.

[web.archive.org]

2. GENERAL – INTERNATIONAL NEWS

2.1. California 33% RPS by 2020

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger continues the state’s clean energy leadership, requiring utilities to serve 33% of their loads with electricity from renewable sources by 2020. Standing before a 3.5-megawatt solar photovoltaic array in Sacramento, the governor signed an executive order Tuesday directing state agencies to create regulations by next summer to meet the 33% target. The order gives the California Air Resources Board (CARB) significant flexibility to increase the target, adjust the timeframe and include energy storage technologies in its regulations. [web.archive.org]

2.2. Australia's ASX to launch RE futures

Australia's futures exchange operator ASX Ltd plans to establish a futures market for renewable energy by the end of the year as the country seeks to quadruple green power generation by 2020. ASX said on Thursday it hoped to list futures and options contracts on Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) before the year-end as demand grows for RECs to offset greenhouse gas emissions and as consumers seek greener energy. [web.archive.org]

2.3. Norway's oil money flooding into green shares

Norway has a problem any country wishes for. . . What to do with its extra money.
This week, Norwegians are voting in a general election that observers say will greatly affect the future of the country's enormous sovereign wealth fund. But what most investors don't realize is that the oil money now starting to trickle out of Norway's national account will soon become a torrent of liquidity in renewable energy markets. That's right — Norway just announced a $4 billion foray into renewable energy shares. . . and that's just the beginning. [web.archive.org]

2.4. Green energy on a roll, but …..

Investors betting on renewable or clean energy and related green themes are looking for healthy and sustainable returns, but the road is full of pitfalls for the unwary, investment managers warned. Attendees at the Jetfin Green 2009 alternative investment conference in Geneva heard that some alternative energy sources are now in a position to compete with more established sources, even in the absence of government subsidies. [web.archive.org]

2.5. Europe’s 30 ‘smart cities’

Europe will select 30 cities to pioneer "smart" electricity grids and space-age insulation as it seeks to lead the global race for green technology, a draft European Union document shows.

The windpower sector must shift offshore and strive to provide a fifth of EU electricity by 2020, said a draft of the European Commission's long-awaited Strategic Energy Technology Plan. [web.archive.org]

2.6. Masdar Institute to get $1.2b funds

The government of Abu Dhabi plans to invest as much as $1.2 billion (Dh4.41 billion) in the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, the world's first graduate academic institution dedicated to the research of alternative energy, environmental technologies and sustainability, the chief executive officer of Masdar (Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company) said. "That's the total budget until the end of 2018 for the Masdar Institute," Dr. Sultan Al Jaber told Gulf News. [web.archive.org]

2.7. World's first green university

The Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (MI) yesterday started the academic year as its first batch of 92 students began lectures at a temporary campus at the Petroleum Institute. Students of 22 nationalities - 13 per cent of whom are Emirati - now comprise what is regarded as the most elite student body in the country, having been selected from among 1,200 applicants from 82 countries worldwide. [web.archive.org]

2.8. Searching for energy ideas

Google, you’re wrong. According to a story in the Washington Post, Google’s green energy czar Bill Weihl told participants at the Reuters Global Climate and Alternative Energy Summit that “there is a lack of companies that have ideas that would be considered breakthroughs in the green technology sector.” Representing the company he noted, "I would say it's reasonable to be a little bit discouraged there and from my point of view, it's not right to be seriously discouraged," he said. "There isn't enough investment going into the early stages of investment pipeline before the venture funds come into the play." [web.archive.org]

2.9. Shell’s Voser sees time as top RE challenge

Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Europe’s biggest oil company, said the time needed for large-scale deployment of new energy sources is a bigger challenge than technological advances in replacing fossil fuels. It takes a decade to bring a major energy project involving new technology to commercial production, Shell Chief Executive Officer Peter Voser said at a conference in Calgary. It takes at least another 25 years for a new energy source to obtain a 1 percent share of the global market, said the Swiss- born Voser, 51, who succeeded Jeroen van der Veer as CEO at Shell, based in The Hague, in July.  [web.archive.org]

2.10. World Bank spends US$ 3.3bn on RE fund

The World Bank has said that its financing for renewable energy and energy efficiency projects in developing countries rose to its highest ever level. The bank said in a statement, made available to the Pan African News Agency  in New York, US that, “financing for renewable energy and energy efficiency projects rose by 24 per cent in the last fiscal year to 3.3 billion dollars''. It said that in the past five years it approved 366 projects in 90 countries. [web.archive.org]

3. GRID AND TRANSMISSION

3.1. Restructuring of Ofgem

Ofgem announced the creation of a new business unit, Ofgem E-Serve, as part of a major restructuring of the regulator to meet the challenge of helping to deliver a low carbon economy. Ofgem E-Serve will focus on administering environmental programmes and the delivery of sustainability projects like offshore wind, smart meters, the proposed carbon capture and storage levy, and feed-in tariffs. [web.archive.org]

3.2. Grid plan for North Sea unveiled

Plans for a North Sea super grid have been published which would seek to wire up the whole of the offshore sector and connect wind farms which cold feed power into Europe. A 20 year development plan for the ambitious project has been outlined at the European Wind Energy Association's conference in Stockholm, Sweden, which would build on the 11 national transmission grids which are already in place around the North Sea, and 21 others planned around the North Sea and Baltic Sea. [web.archive.org]

3.3. Planners approve Ireland Wales link

A major electricity link-up between Ireland and Wales, which will bring power to an estimated 300,000 homes, has been approved by planning officials. The 500MW East-West Interconnector was given the green light by Ireland’s planning agency, granting energy firm EirGrid the go-ahead for the 600M euro (£532M) project, with developers indicating the scheme should create around 100 jobs. The 260km underwater cable, which will be manufactured by Swedish engineering firm ABB, will run from Rush, in north Dublin, to Barkby beach in north Wales, with completion expected in 2012. [web.archive.org]

3.4. Where is the will to power?

……The big utilities: Centrica, RWE NPower, E.ON UK, Scottish & Southern, EDF and ScottishPower are committed to replace ageing coal and nuclear power plant but the costs and rules of the game are still unknown. Will there be a nuclear obligation alongside a wind power obligation? What economic regime will apply to carbon capture? Of course, much of this will be delayed and may not even happen. Within five years, a panicky Department of Energy and Climate Change will license new gas and coal plants and we will find ourselves even more exposed to volatile prices. [web.archive.org]

3.5. The roll out of smart meters

….. The Government believes – as does the European Union in general – that consumers can be helped to reduce their energy consumption by providing them with more information about how much energy is being used by what and when. A display of some kind, the thinking goes, could tell you that your house is consuming a certain amount of power. The householder can then work out whether all active devices are actually needed.
This is the basic concept behind smart metering, but the idea goes further than that. Developing and installing these smart meters will be a massive enterprise fraught with difficulties. [web.archive.org]

4. WIND – UK NEWS (See also Onsite section)

4.1. World’s biggest wind turbine blades

The world’s biggest wind turbine blades will be made in Britain, Energy and Climate Secretary Ed Miliband said. Announcing grants for three offshore wind energy companies Mr Miliband today told the TUC annual conference: “With strong government backing, the UK is consolidating its lead in offshore wind energy. We already have more offshore wind energy than any other country, we have the biggest wind farm in the world about to start construction, and now we’ll see the biggest turbine blades in the world made here in Britain.” ………… The three companies are: Clipper Wind Power - £4.4 million to develop their first prototype 70m blade for the Britannia project – the largest wind turbines in the world; Artemis Intelligent Power - £1 million to transfer their existing technology from automotive to wind energy; Siemens Wind Power UK - £1.1 million to develop the next generation power convertors for their larger offshore turbine. [web.archive.org]

4.2. Welcomed by FoE

Commenting on news that the world’s biggest wind turbine blades will be made in Britain with Government backing, Friends of the Earth's renewable energy campaigner Nick Rau said: "It's great news for Britain that the world's biggest wind turbines will be made here. This is exactly the sort of development that the Government should be supporting. The UK has one of the biggest wind energy potentials in the world - we could be a world leader in developing green power and reap huge economic and environmental benefits.” [web.archive.org]

4.3. Caithness windfarm fatality

A young worker died when he became entangled in his safety harness inside a turbine at a remote wind farm. It is understood that Colin Sinclair, 27, was working at height but did not fall. Police were called to the Causeymire Wind Farm, south of Spittal, near the A9, in Caithness, after staff raised the alarm yesterday morning. Emergency services were told that Mr Sinclair was unconscious and stuck inside one of the 260ft turbines. [web.archive.org]

4.4. First power from Robin Rigg

The Robin Rigg offshore wind farm has produced its first supplies of renewable energy, according to the energy firm E.ON. Based in the Solway Firth, the facility''s first turbine has been turned on and is now said to be offering a source of clean electrical power. Ian Johnson, project manager of the Robin Rigg facility, commented that the switch-on marks a positive move in the ongoing development of the wind farm site. He said: ''There''s still a long, long way to go but, with the weather looking good for the next few days, we''ll be looking to start the commissioning process very soon and to get a lot more turbines turning.'' Boasting a total of 60 turbines, it is hoped the Robin Rigg wind farm will ultimately be able to power as many as 120,000 homes with renewable electrical energy, substantially cutting down on carbon emissions each year. [web.archive.org]

4.5. New quango - change to rural Britain

Millions of people are out and about during these mid-September weekends. They are visiting stately homes, castles, famous gardens and other historic attractions as part of the Open House initiative in London and the various heritage bodies’ open days in the rest of the UK. It’s Britain’s biggest mass-participation event, and it underlines how much we value the finer aspects of a built environment stretching back 4,000 years — and the landscape in which it stands. William Blake’s great exhortation, to build Jerusalem in this green and pleasant land, may sometimes seem farther away than ever. But at least we can be fiercely protective of the green and pleasant land itself, or what remains of it. And it has never needed more protecting, because this autumn a new quango — created, symbolically, by the unelected Lord Mandelson — may usher in the biggest change to the landscape in our lifetime. [web.archive.org]

4.6. Wind firm invests £1.23m and doubles jobs

Vertical Wind Energy (VWE) is to invest £1.23 million which will also see the firm doubling its workforce. The capital injection will enable VWE to fulfill a growing pipeline of sales and accelerate the development of a range of wind turbines suitable for residential and commercial use. It has secured the finance from Northstar Equity Investors, Clarendon Fund Managers and private investors. The Co Antrim-based company currently employs 10 staff, however, it has recently recruited a further six people and has plans to bring an additional four on board next year. [web.archive.org]

4.7. Contractor dives into marine renewables

Liverpool based diving contractors Hughes Sub Surface Engineering are extending their success as a specialist diving and marine service provider in the renewable energy market. They have been working at Rhyl Flats Offshore Wind Farm off the North Wales coast for RWE Npower. The work has included GPS plotting of cables and an emergency call out service for any eventuality which might arise at the wind farm.

http://www.maritimejournal.com/
archive101/2009/september/diving__and__underwater_services/
contractor_dives_into_marine_renewables

4.8. UK's first 'pure-play' offshore wind co.

Scotland's Ramco Energy has unpacked plans to exit the oil and gas industry and become the UK’s first publicly listed firm to focus exclusively on offshore wind. It will also formally adopt the name of its renewables subsidiary, SeaEnergy. Shares in the Aberdeen-based company eased downward 1.4% in early trading (7 Sept) on the news. [web.archive.org]

4.9. Sheringham Shoal - Newt safety assured

Having received a Newt Licence from Natural England - the final hurdle to start of construction - work has now begun on a multi-million pound substation at Salle, near Cawston, as part of the Sheringham Shoal Offshore Wind Farm development. The power generated by the wind farm will be transported to shore at Weybourne, then some 22km from there via underground cables to the new substation, located 16km north west of Norwich city centre. It will then be transported via existing cables to the National Grid. Before work could start on the preparation of the substation site, the developers had to safeguard some possible site inhabitants – Great Crested Newts.

http://www.statoilhydro.com/en/TechnologyInnovation/NewEnergy/
RenewablePowerProduction/Offshore/SheringhamShoel/Pages/NewtSafetyAssured.aspx

4.10. Wind farm threat to Red Kites

An energy company has admitted precious Red Kites are at significant risk from its planned new wind farm complex in South Wales. Now, campaigners against the controversial proposal in the Swansea Valley say they will prosecute npower renewables under the Wildlife and Countryside Act if the farm goes ahead and Red Kites – dubbed Wales’ National Bird – are chopped up in turbine blades. The soaring hawks were so prevalent centuries ago, Shakespeare called London “a city of Red Kites and crows”. But until very recently, the Red Kite was on the brink of extinction. [web.archive.org]

4.11. H&W’s new wind turbines deal

Harland & Wolff has continued its push into the renewable energy sector by securing a new contract to build 30 wind turbines. It is understood that an order had been received for 30 turbines, each of which could produce five megawatts of electricity. The deal is thought to be worth £10m but the company has not officially disclosed who it is with. [web.archive.org]

4.12. Govt urged to help access wind loans

The government needs to spell out how small and medium sized businesses are to benefit from £1 billion in loans pledged to the UK onshore wind sector, a Scottish peer has claimed. Speaking at a conference in Glasgow hosted by renewable energy supplier SmartestEnergy, Lord Jim Wallace commended a commitment by the Department for Energy and Climate Change in July that three UK-based banks, RBS, Lloyds and BNP Paribas Fortis, would work with the European Investment Bank to lend the money over the next three years to projects struggling in the credit crunch. [web.archive.org]

4.13. Work begins on Arecleoch

ScottishPower Renewables, the UK subsidiary of Iberdrola Renovables (the largest wind energy company in the world), has officially begun construction work on the Arecleoch windfarm near Barrhill in South Ayrshire. With installed capacity of 120 MW wind power, the site will produce enough clean, green energy to power 67,000 homes. [web.archive.org]

4.14. Expansion for Kilbraur wind farm

A wind farm development in Scotland is set to be extended after receiving government permission to improve its capacity. The Kilbraur wind farm site, which is based near Golspie in Sutherland, will now see the power it can produce increase from 47.5 MW to 67.5 MW. It is hoped that by introducing eight more turbines to the project, as many as 30 new jobs could be created for construction purposes. [web.archive.org]

4.15. Gust of good news for Quayle Munro

Quayle Munro, the Edinburgh-based merchant bank, has won the mandate to raise funds for a new £120 million windfarm in Norway as it sees a pick up in the drive to develop and invest in renewable sources of energy. The company will advise on securing debt capital for the 70-megawatt windfarm, sited near Stavanger. This latest mandate follows the recent announcement of a similar contract in Scotland. The firm said it believed the deals showed a growing inclination by companies to push renewable projects on commercial as well as ethical grounds. [web.archive.org]

4.16. Falck’s HQ moves to Inverness

Inverness is to become a green energy hub with a firm's decision to make the Scottish city its headquarters. Falck Renewables, part of Italy's Falck Group, has opened a new office in the city from which it will monitor the five windfarms it has in the region and 11 other facilities across the UK, the Aberdeen Press and Journal reports. This week saw the company begin operating its Kilbraur windfarm near Rogart, Sutherland, following the recent opening of its 20-turbine Millennium windfarm near Glenmoriston. Managing director of the company, Willie Heller, commented: "Falck's decision to bring their European operational headquarters to the Highlands is a big vote of confidence in the renewable sector's future in our region." [web.archive.org]

4.17. Fishermen seek compensation

The Lynn and Inner Dowsing wind farms were officially launched by Centrica at Gibraltar Point, Skegness, on Monday, despite a row about compensation for fisherman. Andy Roper chairman of the Greater Wash Fishing Industries group, which represents fishermen within The Wash from Kings Lynn to Boston, told the Standard many fishermen have been devastated by a loss of earnings when cables and foundations were laid during the mussel harvesting season off the Skegness coast. [web.archive.org]

4.18. Wind farm battle to go to High Court

Jane Davis and her husband Julian from Deeping, St Nicholas live less than 1,000 metres from a huge wind farm that was built three years ago. The couple say the noise from the eight 330 ft (100m) turbines keeps them awake at night and has forced them to move into rented accommodation. In an effort to have the turbines switched off at night or even taken down altogether the couple are planning to take the developers, landowners and operators to the High Court. [web.archive.org]

4.19. BWEA31: Building an industry

BWEA's 31st annual conference and exhibition will take place over 20-22 October 2009 at ACC Liverpool, a landmark regeneration project on the outstanding Mersey River Waterfront sited next to the famous grade one listed Albert Dock. It is also one of the most sustainable venues in Europe - designed to produce half the CO2 emissions it would without any environmentally-friendly measures. It even has its very own wind turbines. [web.archive.org]

5. WIND – INTERNATIONAL NEWS

5.1. World's biggest offshore windfarm launched

The world's largest offshore windfarm was inaugurated in the North Sea today (17 September) – with a high-profile display of the intermittent nature of this power source. Danish Crown Prince Frederik pressed the button to start the Horns Rev 2 project, which uses 91 turbines to generate enough green power for 200,000 households. But an industry audience brought together in a civic centre to watch the opening via a videolink with the 209MW windfarm, watched in silence as the turbines failed to turn. Half a minute later as a breeze developed and the first blade slowly began to rotate, there were cheers of relief as much as joy from executives of the developer, Dong, and its guests. [web.archive.org]

5.2. SSE’s Swedish wind joint venture

Scottish and Southern Energy has entered into an agreement to form a joint venture with a Swedish wind farm consortium to develop a 89MW onshore wind farm in Jamtland, Sweden. While project development is at an advanced stage, construction work will not begin before 2011. Scottish and Southern Energy (SSE) has said that the Jamtland region has been identified by the Swedish government as an area of national interest for wind energy development. [web.archive.org]

5.3. German wind farms approved

Germany cleared the way Wednesday (16 September) for the construction of offshore wind farms in the North Sea as part of its plan to expand the use of renewable energy. The cabinet approved zoning regulations that would allow the turbines to be sited at places in Germany's exclusive economic zone, outside the 12-mile territorial limit. [web.archive.org]

5.4. Wind - 17% of EU's electricity by 2030

Offshore wind could provide as much as 17% of the European Union's electricity demand by 2030, according to a European Wind Energy Agency (EWEA) report. However, the trade association has stressed that the sector must overcome various challenges to progress such as developing a European offshore grid, gaining more political support and improving member states' planning procedures, in order to make its visions a reality. [web.archive.org]

5.5. Vestas launches new offshore turbine

Danish wind specialist Vestas has launched a new turbine model for the offshore wind market, the company announced at the European Offshore Wind Conference in Stockholm, Sweden. The V112-3.0MW offshore model is optimised for the conditions at sea and can generate more power than any other turbine in the 3MW class, the company said. Vestas said the turbine represents an "exceptional rotor-to-generator ratio for greater efficiency, delivering high reliability, serviceability and availability under all wind and weather conditions." [web.archive.org]

5.6. BP sells Indian wind assets

As BP continues to focus its wind business on its major development portfolio in the US, it today announced the sale of its wind power interests in India. Green Infra Limited has purchased BP's subsidiary, BP Energy India Private Limited (BPEIPL), which owns and operates three wind farms in India with a total generating capacity of approximately 100 megawatts (MW), for a total cash-free, debt-free enterprise value of 4.622 billion Rupees (approximately $95 million). [web.archive.org]

5.7. GE Indian wind turbine plant

GE Energy will build its first wind turbine plant in India and hopes to have the initial 1.5 megawatt XLE model off the assembly line in the second half of 2010. Teipreet Singh Chopra, chief executive of GE India, says a location in southern India has not been finalized. He notes GE’s XLE model is most suited for a lower velocity wind environment such as India’s. [web.archive.org]

5.8. Inauguration of Hywind floating wind turbine

Technip joined StatoilHydro in celebrating the inauguration of the Hywind demonstration wind turbine, which took place on September 8 in Karmøy, Norway. Located 10 kilometers offshore Karmøy, Hywind is the first full-scale floating wind turbine and has a capacity of 2.3 MW. Following the award of the turnkey contract for the substructure of the wind turbine in May 2008, Technip’s operating center in Oslo, Norway, performed the project management and installation engineering. Detail design and fabrication of the substructure was carried out at the Group’s construction yard in Pori, Finland, which is specialized in the construction of Spar platforms. http://www.oilvoice.com/n/Technip_and_StatoilHydro_Announce_Inauguration_of_Worlds_First_Full
Scale_Floating_Wind_Turbine/767657b69.aspx

6. WAVE AND TIDAL

6.1. Funding boost for MCT and Pelamis

Two of the UK's leading marine energy companies will receive a boost from the Carbon Trust, with grants of £400,000 to help scale up their technologies and bring them closer to commercial reality. Marine Current Turbines (MCT), developer of the SeaGen tidal power device, and Pelamis Wave Power, which makes a wave-energy converter that looks like a giant snake, will share the money to design and build more efficient ways to install their machines. Installation can account for up to half the cost of a project and the Carbon Trust says will delay more widespread use of the marine technology unless costs are brought down. [web.archive.org]

6.2. World’s first commercial tidal energy scheme

npower renewables and Bristol-based tidal power developers Marine Current Turbines (MCT), have announced a pioneering partnership to help deliver one of the world’s first commercial-scale tidal stream projects, off the coast of Anglesey, north Wales.  The innovative showcase tidal farm scheme would be capable of generating 10.5 megawatts (MW) of clean, green power, drawn entirely from the sea’s major tidal currents.  [web.archive.org]

6.3. Barrage and road dualling are ‘key’ – Hain

Peter Hain interviewed by South Wales Argus reporter Natalie Crockett: The former leader of the Commons spoke positively about harnessing the green energy of the Severn Estuary and is supporting an option to build a barrage, which could potentially produce five percent of the UK’s energy generated by tidal power. He said: “We have got a unique and precious asset, one of the biggest sources of tidal power in the world and we need to use it. Otherwise it’s a tremendous waste of this natural resource that costs nothing.” [web.archive.org]

6.4. Obama’s ocean task force releases report

With demands on US ocean resources control growing quickly, the Obama administration today outlined a new comprehensive ocean management plan to guide federal agencies in restoring and protecting a badly stressed US coastal and ocean environment. Today’s policy shift proposed by the president’s Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force holds enormous potential for sweeping changes in how the nation’s oceans are managed, including energy development, experts say. [web.archive.org]

6.5. S.Africa – big wave project investigation

Investigations are currently under way to determine the viability of constructing a R15-billion 770-MW ocean wave energy project in the Western Cape. The project is being developed by Darling-based project developer Wave Energy Generation. In an exclusive interview with Engineering News, Hermann Oelsner of Wave Energy Generation elaborates that South Africa’s south-western coast is a good location for a wave energy project. [web.archive.org]

6.6. Ocean energy developments

Blessed with one of the longest coastlines of any country in Europe, large tidal ranges and strong winds, it is perhaps obvious that as the home of one of the largest marine energy resources, the United Kingdom should also sport by far the largest concentration of marine power companies in the world. However, while the UK has taken a lead, it is far from alone. According to the IEA-OES, also known as the Implementing Agreement on Ocean Energy Systems which functions within a framework created by the International Energy Agency (IEA), by the end of 2008, more than 25 countries were involved in ocean renewable energy technology development activities. With the deployment of multi-unit wave technology in Portugal, and the commencement of construction of a 260 MW tidal power plant in South Korea standing out as noteworthy. [web.archive.org]

6.7. Impact of RE on oceans must be investigated

Scientists from the Universities of Exeter and Plymouth are today calling for urgent research to understand the impact of renewable energy developments on marine life. The study, now published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, highlights potential environmental benefits and threats resulting from marine renewable energy, such as off-shore wind farms and wave and tidal energy conversion devices. [web.archive.org]

6.8. TAG on the crest of a wave

The consortium set up to deliver the doomed SeaDragon project has won the contract to build a groundbreaking wave power prototype, described as a “new dawn” for the industry. Tees Alliance Group (TAG) will build a one megawatt system that can be connected to existing offshore wind arrays for Norwegian-based client Langlee Wave Power. The Langlee E2 Wave Power System could revolutionise the fledgling marine renewables sector by slashing the energy price per kilowatt hour, the high cost of which is currently one of the major barriers to widespread commercialisation. Once proven, the system will be mass produced for sale to European and world markets. [web.archive.org]

6.9. Tests of tidal generators approved

The Canadian province of Nova Scotia has approved testing of three submersed tidal power generators in the Bay of Fundy. Provincial Environment Minister Sterling Belliveau made the announcement in Halifax, but said there were strict conditions attached to the tests, foremost being environmental impact studies. [web.archive.org]

6.10. Tidal devices to be put to the test

A tidal power turbine up to 10 metres in diameter will be installed in the Bay of Fundy this fall, as companies begin testing methods of harnessing some of the earth's mightiest water flows. The Nova Scotia government and the federal Fisheries Department announced environmental approval Tuesday for test projects for three companies to place their turbines in the inner bay, where the world's highest tides rush in and out each day. There is one small existing tidal power station at the mouth of the Annapolis River, providing sufficient power for 6,000 homes. [web.archive.org]

6.11. Study on Alternative to Severn Barrage

The STFC (Severn Tidal Fence Consortium) has appointed Metoc to provide expert advice on environmental impacts and mitigation in the key areas of construction, fisheries, tidal water levels and sediment transport in the Severn Estuary. Following an announcement by DECC (Department of Energy and Climate Change) on the 15th July, the STFC is now confirmed as a successful bidder to share in the SETS (Severn Embryonic Technology Scheme) fund.

The SETS £500K cross-government fund is to stimulate and explore the potential for a reduced impact on the natural environment of conventional tidal technologies for energy generation - such as the proposed Severn Barrage. [web.archive.org]

6.12. WATTS 20009

The UK has long-regarded itself as the world leader in marine renewables. This reputation was established through our impressive performance in device development, with both clear leaders and a long and innovative tail. The WATTS conference – the Wave and Tidal Technology Symposium - was launched in 2003 to showcase this remarkable diversity. Yet how well deserved is this accolade six years on? It takes more than smart technology to develop a marine renewables industry. Deployment needs a healthy environment which fosters project development. This requires financial incentives and appropriate consenting regimes. Can the UK maintain its position as world leader?  Are there lessons to be learned from other countries to help us build a firm platform from which this promising industry can take off? [web.archive.org]

7. BIOENERGY (See also Sustainable Transport)

7.1. One stop shop for anaerobic digestion info

Farmers interested in the potential of Anaerobic Digestion (AD) can now benefit from a new time-saving 'one-stop-shop' that brings together specialist information about AD in one place. Until now information has been spread over various different websites. The new web portal http://www.biogas-info.co.uk/ is designed to be a gateway for those new to AD in agriculture, industry or local government and provides help and advice on biogas, digestate and feedstocks. The site also includes information on planning permission and environmental permits and importantly the available incentives and funding for new AD projects. Farmers will also be able to access the AD cost calculator which will allow them to assess the economics of investing in new AD facilities. [web.archive.org]

7.2. ‘Flagship’ biomass plant opens

First Minister Rhodri Morgan will today (8 September) officially open Wales’ first commercial scale biomass plant. The £33m Western Wood Energy Plant at Longlands Lane, Margam, Port Talbot, which is now fully operational, generates enough electricity to power the equivalent of 31,000 homes a year. Developed by Cardiff-based international renewable energy company, Eco2 Ltd, in partnership with Good Energies and Port Talbot’s Western Log Group, the project created 200 construction jobs during its two-year build phase. The 14 MW plant directly employs 20 permanent staff and also uses mainly Welsh wood as fuel. [web.archive.org]

7.3. Strong protest over biomass plant

More than 90 objections have been lodged against proposals for a £20million wood-burning power station which, it is claimed, could destroy a Highland village and seriously damage its life-blood tourist industry. Villagers at Invergarry have united to oppose the energy plant, which could provide enough electricity to power 10,000 homes. [web.archive.org]=

7.4. European farming’s aim

"The sector can do more to store carbon in farmland soils," Mariann Fischer Boel, the EU agriculture commissioner, said on Tuesday September 15 at a meeting with European agriculture ministers in southern Sweden. However, Fischer Boel stressed that farmers would need support to make the changes needed to reduce emissions. "We can't just leave them to sink or swim: many of them would sink, with disastrous consequences for our food production base and our environment," she said. [web.archive.org]

Pigs produce crackling of electricityWhere there's pig muck there's brass. A farmer has been given a £568,000 government grant to convert porcine dung into electricity and cash. In the biggest project of its kind in Scotland, East Lothian landowner Jamie Wyllie will build a £1.5 million "anaerobic digester" to turn pig slurry into power for his farm, with any surplus being sold to the national grid. [web.archive.org]

7.6. Bioenergy 09

This year’s REA conference (8-9 October, Stoneleigh Park, Warwickshire) promises to be extremely lively and instructive, dealing with all the issues surrounding the bioenergy industry today. There are four streams to the conference which will be held over two days, featuring biogas, biomass, heating and renewable transport. There is a plenary session covering how to obtain funding for bioenergy projects. [web.archive.org]

8. HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELLS (See also Sustainable Transport)

8.1. Scotland hydrogen plans welcomed

An international United Nations (U.N.) conference has been discussing ‘Scotland’s Hydrogen Future’, including a newly unveiled plan for a ‘hydrogen corridor’ from Aberdeen to Inverness. Experts from around the world have been attending the conference at the Scottish Government Headquarters in Edinburgh……. The ‘Scottish Hydrogen Corridor’ will run from Aberdeen to Inverness, via Findhorn in Moray. This highway will employ a diversity of renewable energy solutions in different locations with hydrogen refuelling stations placed at strategic locations along the route to service a range of users including public transport providers, local authority vehicles, Royal Mail vans and ultimately private car users. [web.archive.org]

8.2. £7.2 million for HFC Demo programme

A competition for up to £7.2 million of funding for companies to develop Hydrogen and Fuel Cell technology opens today. The competition is being funded by the Department of Energy and Climate Change and is part of measures for stimulating low carbon technologies announced in this year’s budget. Companies will be able to bid to the Technology Strategy Board, who will manage the programme, for a share of the cash to develop and test the technology. Hydrogen and Fuel Cells have the potential to help drastically reduce carbon emissions because they only emit water and heat as by products. The energy conversion in fuel cells is more efficient than those of other technologies such as the internal combustion engine. [web.archive.org]

9. HYDROPOWER

9.1. China hydropower to near double by 2020

China's hydropower capacity is expected to nearly double to 300,000 megawatts by 2020, state media said, as the nation powers ahead with the development of renewable energy sources. Water resources minister Chen Lei, who was quoted by the official Xinhua news agency as giving the target, also said hydropower would play a more important role in China's strategy for energy security in the future. [web.archive.org]

9.2. Six turbines to be built anew at Siberian plant

Six out of ten turbines have to be built anew at the Sayano-Shushenskaya hydropower plant in Siberia, which was ruined in August when water flooded the turbine room and took a toll of 75 lives, Russia's Itar-Tass news agency reported. At the first stage four turbines can be restored, but will have to be replaced after their service life period expires, Deputy Prime Minister Igor Sechin said. At the second stage six new turbines will be built, he said and estimated restoration will cost over 40 billion rubles (US$1.31 billion). [web.archive.org]

9.3. Water power for 350 Lakes homes

Up to 350 homes are set to be powered by a South Lakeland river. Work is about to start on a hydroelectric station at Beck Foot Farm, close to Duddon Bridge. It should be up and running by April and will generate electricity for the National Grid using water from Logan Gill, an offshoot of the River Duddon. The site is just under two miles from Broughton. [web.archive.org]

9.4. The BHA Annual Conference

"Hydro in the Driving Seat" 14th - 15th October 2009. The BHA 8th Annual Conference is aimed at the whole of the hydropower industry and its associated stakeholders. Sponsorship packages and exhibition spaces are available - Contact Ellan Long for more details (tel: +44 (0)1202 880333 or email [email protected]) [web.archive.org]

10. LOW CARBON BUILDINGS, MICROGENERATION, ONSITE RENEWABLES AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY

10.1. Brits want new homes with cheap energy

Over 20 million people in Britain would be willing to pay more money for a home which tackles energy supplier prices through the use of renewable resources, according to the Energy Saving Trust (EST). Fresh data shows that half of those surveyed are trying to find out whether they can fit microgeneration equipment in their existing home, although a similar number say they are discouraged by the high cost of installation, reports Fair Home. Homeowners could bear in mind that a move to switch energy resources and invest in equipment such as solar panels or hydro-power could also increase the value of the property. [web.archive.org]

10.2. Wind turbines at Haverigg Prison?

The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) and Partnerships for Renewables have announced that they are working together to investigate the possibility of siting wind turbines at Haverigg Prison in south-west Cumbria, the start of the ‘Energy Coast’. With the potential to generate a substantial amount of renewable electricity, the project could see Haverigg Prison play a proactive role in helping the Government meet its targets for renewable energy generation and reduction of greenhouse gases. [web.archive.org]

10.3. Coal Authority working with PfR

The Coal Authority has announced that it is working with Partnerships for Renewables to investigate hosting renewable energy projects on its land. Philip Lawrence, Chief Executive of the Coal Authority, said: “The Coal Authority is charged with managing the legacy left by a coal mining industry that was central to the industrial revolution. The Coal Authority is exploring ways of transforming its remaining property portfolio into sustainable assets, playing a part in the environmental revolution and generating both green energy and revenues.” [web.archive.org]

10.4. Railwind concept project launched

Wind energy project developer Evelop, part of Eneco, and Dutch railway group ProRail have signed a joint venture agreement to develop the Railwind concept which involves wind turbines above railway tracks on specially designed masts. [web.archive.org]

10.5. CHP – small is beautiful

Groundbreaking micro-CHP (combined heat & power) technology is available for the first time in the UK following a new Anglo-Japanese agreement.  Greater Manchester-based sustainable power business ENER-G Combined Power Limited has entered into a technology partnership with Japanese manufacturer Yanmar that will enable whole new sectors to harness low-carbon technology. Commenting on the partnership, ENER-G sales manager Anthony Mayall said: “The Micro CHP range expands our capability from 4kWe to 10MWe, which is unique to the market place and means we can extend beyond our previous lower limit of 35kWe and help organisations with smaller buildings with their energy efficiency. This product range means ENER-G comfortably has the broadest product range on the market.” [web.archive.org]

10.6. 2m homes helped by Warm Front

Two million vulnerable homes have now been helped through the Government’s flagship scheme to tackle fuel poverty and fight climate change. Two million vulnerable homes have now been helped through the Government’s flagship scheme to tackle fuel poverty and fight climate change. Since the Warm Front scheme began in 2000, more than £2.2 billion has been spent giving people on qualifying benefits the peace of mind they can afford to heat their homes in the winter. [web.archive.org]

10.7. Planning blamed for Windsave liquidation

The residential arm of Scottish micro wind generation company Windsave, which supplied 'roof windmills' to former energy minister Brian Wilson, has gone into liquidation. The company says that the closure of Glasgow-based Residential Windsave Ltd is not expected to result in many job losses. The company stressed that its business to business (B2B) arm was still trading healthily. The company's product, the WS1200, was designed to use low wind speeds to create electricity and was supported by former energy minister Brian Wilson, who had a windmill installed on his roof. [web.archive.org]

10.8. Scots taking interest in home RE

The Energy Saving Trust said that 42% of Scots would be willing to pay more for a home where some of their energy supply came from renewable resources such as wind or solar. It seems that Scots are more interested than ever in installing a renewable-energy source to their property. [web.archive.org]=

10.9. Sustainable cities are the solution

New York mayor Michael Bloomberg unveiled a $25m, energy-efficient office building on the Brooklyn waterfront a few months back. The Perry Avenue Building features solar panels, rainwater-fed toilets and six rooftop windmills, which will produce 10% of its energy supply. "Wind power in this city," said the mayor, "is one of the solutions to our problem." That problem – devising more sustainable cities – has rightfully drawn a great deal of attention of late. [web.archive.org]

10.10. Smart Energy - focus on decentralised energy

The energy market is changing. Energy users, be they public bodies or large corporations, retail units or housing associations, hotels or factories, are increasingly conscious of volatile prices, unstable supply and their carbon footprint, and are taking matters into their own hands by opting for self-generation. Set against this background, the inaugural Smart Energy Show is being held 1 and 2 December 2009 at the iconic Wembley Stadium in London. Developed by the Renewable Energy Association (REA) who are organising the conference; and Media Generation Ventures Ltd who are organising the exhibition, the new show is designed for energy users and beneficiaries of the new feed in tariffs set to start in 2010. [web.archive.org]

11. SOLAR

11.1. EU States shine a light on PV barriers

EU member states are taking part in a project that aims to find solutions to barriers that hold up the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) power systems and legal issues of connecting to the grid. The 30-month 'PV LEGAL' European programme involves 12 EU member states including the UK, France, Italy, Poland and Spain. Project members want to find out why it can take months to years to erect PV systems in the UK and other European countries and how solar can better connect to the grid. [web.archive.org]

11.2. REA role in PV LEGAL

The REA is leading the UK work on a major 30 month European programme to analyse the barriers to installing and connecting solar photovoltaic power systems and involving 11 other EU member states. [web.archive.org]

11.3. Google’s solar plans

Google is developing mirror technology that could reduce the cost of solar-powered turbine plants as part of its investment in green innovations. The internet search giant is focusing on solar thermal technology in which the sun's energy is used to turn a turbine. Mirrors are used to focus the sun's rays. Bill Weihl, the company's green energy czar, said: “We've been looking at very unusual materials for the mirrors both for the reflective surface as well as the substrate that the mirror is mounted on.” [web.archive.org]

12. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT

12.1. Government loan for electric car maker

The government announced a £10M loan to Tata Motors European Technical Centre (TMETC) under the Automotive Assistance Programme (AAP) set up to support investment in a lower carbon future for the industry. The £10M from Government will support £25M of investment from Tata Motors to develop and manufacture electric vehicles in the UK. The award of the AAP loan is a tangible demonstration of the UK government’s commitment to the development of low-carbon vehicles and to the reduction of C02 emissions. The scheme is intended to support companies as they invest in greener products and processes, and this first award under the scheme demonstrates the UK government and industry working together for a lower carbon future.  [web.archive.org]

12.2. Marine fuel cell project passes a milestone

Installation of a full scale fuel cell on board the Eidesvik offshore supply vessel Viking Lady in Stord, Norway, marks an important milestone for the FellowSHIP project. According to project partner DNV, Viking Lady will be the first merchant vessel ever to test fuel cell technology for production of electricity on board. The FellowSHIP project was initiated by DNV in 2003 to adapt fuel cell technology for use for the future propulsion of vessels. The fuel cell system now installed in Viking Lady has been tested onshore at Stord for the past couple of months. The next step will be testing of the fuel cell at sea. [web.archive.org]

12.3. GM rolls past 1 million miles in fuel cell demo

General Motors Co. is now 1 million miles into its fuel cell experiment and company officials say having everyday people drive a test fleet of pollution-free cars has convinced them they are on the right track. The automaker on Friday said it passed the 1 million-miles-driven mark in its fuel cell Chevrolet Equinox vehicles, with about 5,000 people rotating in and out of more than 100 cars over the past 25 months. [web.archive.org]

12.4. Germany - nationwide hydrogen fuel network by 2015

On behalf of the German government, the transport minister Wolfgang Tiefensee has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with eight industrial partners to set up the H2 mobility scheme. High profile participants include Daimler, EnBW, Linde, OMV, Shell, Total, Vattenfall and the NOW GmbH National Organisation Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology. [web.archive.org]

12.5. U.S. House considers green vehicle R&D

Targeting more spending toward the auto industry, the House on Wednesday considered expanding government-led research into how to make cars more fuel-efficient. The House was debating a bill that could allow the Energy Department to spend up to $200 million more per year on research and development for advanced-technology vehicles and auto parts. Aides said it could lead Congress to increase annual spending on the research to as much as $550 million. [web.archive.org]

12.6. Bike to the future

There’s been an immense amount of talk about China’s investment in Greentech so this morning I took time off from the conference hall to visit two Chinese companies that are leading the way in this field. Most exciting was the chance to drive a hydrogen-fuel-cell bike made by Sunrise Power, which is China’s leading researcher in fuel-cell technology. They supplied all the hydrogen fuel cell buses and cars for the Olympics last year.  The bike really was something. The fuel cell is contained in that tiny pannier on the back - it’s hard to explain how ’space-age’ it felt, being powered along by this tiny little device, whirring silently away behind you. [web.archive.org]

12.7. US soy drops off?

It seems that the countervailing tariffs introduced by the EU against imports of American biodiesel may be having an effect on the biofuel supplied in the UK. In the first year of the RTFO, US soy was the principle biodiesel feedstock reported to us. However, the volume of soy biodiesel from America reported in the second month of 2009/10 dropped sharply to below 10 million litres, the lowest since the obligation was introduced. [Extract from the RFA’s latest issue of Renewable Fuels Digest – issue 14]. [web.archive.org]

13. CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE

13.1. Siemens and E.ON team up for CCS

Power providers E.On and Siemens are working together on a pilot CO2 capture plant at the hard-coal fired Staudinger Unit 5, near Hanau, Germany. The facility, which will run on part of the flu gas from Unit 5, will run until the end of 2010 and serve as a large-scale demonstration plant for the technology. Siemen’s said its post-combustion process can remove 90% of the CO2 from the flue gas using special cleaning agents, and that its process can be teamed with the further developed steam power plant process. It will enter commission at about 2015. [web.archive.org]

13.2. CCS, nuclear in carbon markets – IEA call

The International Energy Agency (IEA) is calling on negotiators at the Copenhagen climate change summit to extend carbon markets to allow nuclear and carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects in developing markets to participate in emission trading schemes. [web.archive.org]

13.3. Clean Coal and Carbon Capture and Storage

The Industrial and Power Association (IPA) is holding a conference “Clean Coal and Carbon Capture and Storage” – at Falkirk on 30 September 09 – with a post-conference visit to see the 1 MW replica of ScottishPower’s carbon capture demonstration project at Longannet. [web.archive.org]

14. NUCLEAR

14.1. UKAEA privatised in Babcock sale

The body responsible for decommissioning and cleaning up Britain's fleet of nuclear power stations was sold today in the latest privatisation of part of the UK's nuclear industry. UKAEA, the commercial arm of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, has been bought by Babcock International Group for £50m. Business secretary Lord Mandelson claimed the deal "generates good value for taxpayers", but opposition politicians have previously voiced concerns over the sale. [web.archive.org] 

14.2. Rolls Royce support EDF nuclear plans

Rolls-Royce, the global power systems company, has announced plans to collaborate with EDF Energy, the UK subsidiary of the French utility group, on the latter's plans to construct of four new nuclear power plants in the UK. The agreement covers engineering and technical support during both the pre and post construction phases. In addition, joint development, validation and supervision of the supply chain, together with the potential for the provision of nuclear related systems, will be explored. [web.archive.org]

15. KEEPING IN TOUCH

15.1. All-Energy daily newsfeeds

Bookmark [web.archive.org] to see our daily newsfeeds. If you would like a link between our newsfeeds and your website, we would be delighted to talk to you about the idea – just email [email protected]; AND, keep in touch with your news for inclusion in [email protected], please put [email protected] on your press list and send us all relevant press releases.

15.2. ‘Energy’ the All-Energy official publication

For monthly in-depth stories read The Press & Journal’s ‘Energy’ online at [web.archive.org]

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