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liberal arts - Britannica Concise

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liberal arts

Britannica Concise
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College or university curriculum aimed at imparting general knowledge and developing general intellectual capacities, in contrast to a professional, vocational, or technical curriculum.

In Classical antiquity, the term designated the education proper to a freeman (Latin liber, “free”) as opposed to a slave. In the medieval Western university, the seven liberal arts were grammar, rhetoric, and logic (the trivium) and geometry, arithmetic, music, and astronomy (the quadrivium). In modern colleges and universities, the liberal arts include the study of literature, languages, philosophy, history, mathematics, and science.

Images and Media: More on "liberal arts" from Britannica Concise: Davidson College - Private liberal arts college in Davidson, North Carolina, U.S., founded in 1837. Middlebury College - Private liberal arts college in Middlebury, Vt., founded in 1800. Pratt Institute - Private institution of higher learning in Brooklyn, New York, New York, U.S. Bryn Mawr College - Private women's liberal arts college in Bryn Mawr, Pa., near Philadelphia. Colgate University - Private university in Hamilton, N.Y. More on "liberal arts" from the 32 Volume Encyclopædia Britannica: liberal arts - college or university curriculum aimed at imparting general knowledge and developing general intellectual capacities in contrast to a professional, vocational, or technical curriculum. In the medieval European university the seven liberal arts were grammar, rhetoric, and logic (the trivium) and geometry, arithmetic, music, and astronomy (the quadrivium). In modern colleges and universities the ... Art Center College of Design - private coeducational institution of higher learning in Pasadena, California, U.S., emphasizing instruction in design and visual arts. The college offers bachelor's and master's degree programs in nine major areas: advertising, environmental design, film, fine art, graphic design, illustration, photography, product design, and transportation design. These degree programs are supported by several ... Art Nouveau - ornamental style of art that flourished between about 1890 and 1910 throughout Europe and the United States. Art Nouveau is characterized by its use of a long, sinuous, organic line and was employed most often in architecture, interior design, jewelry and glass design, posters, and illustration. It was a deliberate attempt to create a new style, free of the imitative historicism that dominated ... Cooper Union - tuition-free undergraduate college in New York, New York, U.S. It was endowed in 1859 by merchant and philanthropist Peter Cooper for the "advancement of science and art," and its financial resources were later increased by the Hewitt and Carnegie families. Green Camp, a 1,000-acre (400-hectare) tract in Ringwood, New Jersey, was acquired in 1941-44 for an adjunct educational and recreational ... Encyclopedie - (French: "Encyclopaedia, or Classified Dictionary of Sciences, Arts, and Trades"), the 18th-century French encyclopaedia that was one of the chief works of the Philosophes, men dedicated to the advancement of science and secular thought and the new tolerance and open-mindedness of the Enlightenment. The Encyclopedie was a literary and philosophical enterprise with profound political, social, and ... To cite this article:
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