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Human Rights Watch: Middle East and Northern Africa : Morocco

success fail Nov DEC Jan 23 2002 2003 2004 914 captures 23 Dec 2003 - 22 Sep 2019 About this capture COLLECTED BY Collection: web_is Crawl performed by Internet Archive. This data is currently not publicly accessible. TIMESTAMPS
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Morocco

United States: Powell's North Africa Trip Should Focus on Rights
U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell should raise pressing human rights concerns in Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco during his visit to North Africa on December 2 and 3, Human Rights Watch said today.
November 27, 2003    Press Release

Press Freedom in Morocco Set Back by Journalist Jailing
The affirmation Tuesday of a 3-year prison term for journalist Ali Mrabet is a grave blow to press freedom in Morocco, Human Rights Watch said today. A Rabat appeals court upheld a lower court verdict that also banned the independent weeklies that Mrabet directs, Demain and its Arabic sister Douman.
June 18, 2003    Press Release

The War on Women
After the Sept. 11 attacks, the U.S. government threw its full energies into combating terrorism emerging from militants in the Islamic world. But it has done little to expose and condemn the ways some states are using radical interpretations of Islamic law, or Shariah, to subordinate and exclude women. The U.S. should be equally concerned about the consequences of these interpretations on Muslims as well as non-Muslims.
August 22, 2002    Commentary

State Abuse of Unaccompanied Migrant Children by Spain and Morocco
Every year thousands of Moroccan children, some as young as ten, enter Spain alone without proper documentation. Many arrive via the Spanish port cities of Ceuta and Melilla, where they face beatings by Spanish police and staff at residential centers for children; beatings and extortion by other children at the centers; arbitrary denial of access to education and health care; arbitrary age determination procedures; and summary expulsions to Morocco. Children who have been expelled to Morocco typically face beatings by police and detention in unsafe conditions before being turned out on the streets to fend for themselves.
June 1, 2002    Advocacy Impact

Spain and Morocco Abuse Child Migrants
Beatings, Summary Expulsions of Unaccompanied Children Commonplace
(Madrid, May 7, 2002) Moroccan migrant children in Spain are frequently beaten by police and abused by staff and other children in overcrowded, unsanitary residential centers, Human Rights Watch charged in a report released today. Spain also summarily expels children as young as eleven to Morocco, where Moroccan police beat and ill-treat them and then abandon them to the streets.
May 7, 2002    Press Release

Nowhere To Turn:
State Abuses of Unaccompanied Migrant Children by Spain and Morocco
Moroccan migrant children in Spain are frequently beaten by police and abused by staff and other children in overcrowded, unsanitary residential centers, Human Rights Watch charged in this report. Spain also summarily expels children as young as eleven to Morocco, where Moroccan police beat and ill-treat them and then abandon them to the streets. The sixty-two page report, "Nowhere to Turn: State Abuses of Unaccompanied Migrant Children by Spain and Morocco," documents widespread abuse of Moroccan children who travel alone to the Spanish cities of Ceuta and Melilla, located on the North African coast. Human Rights Watch interviewed dozens of current and former migrant children during a five-week investigation in Spain and Morocco. Many children had been summarily expelled multiple times.
HRW Index No.: D1404
May 7, 2002    Report
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Spain and Morocco Abuse Child Migrants
Testimony of Unaccompanied Migrant Children In Ceuta and Melilla

May 7, 2002    Testimony

Morocco: CIA Should Release Files
The U.S. Central Intelligence Agency should declassify all files pertaining to the kidnap and "disappearance" of Moroccan opposition leader Mehdi Ben Barka, Human Rights Watch said today.
February 26, 2002    Press Release

Letter to CIA Requesting Complete Disclosure of Information on Mehdi Ben Barka Case.
This is a request under the Freedom of Information Act. Human Rights Watch and the Institut Ben Barka are writing to request a copy of all documents pertaining to the surveillance and abduction of Mehdi Ben Barka, a Moroccan national, in France in 1965, and his subsequent “disappearance.”
February 26, 2002    Letter

Moroccan Court Acquits Rights Activists
(London, November 21, 2001) -- Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch welcomed today's acquittal of thirty-six human rights activists by a Rabat, Morocco appeals court.
November 21, 2001    Press Release

Morocco/Western Sahara: Freedom of Assembly on Trial
On 21 November 2001 the Court of Appeal in Rabat acquitted 36 human rights defenders who had been sentenced earlier in the year to three months in prison for “participating in the organization of an unauthorized demonstration” on 9 December 2000.
November 21, 2001    Background Briefing

The U.S. and France Should Release Files on 1965 ‘Disappearance’ of Mehdi Ben Barka
The U.S. and French governments should declassify files relating to the 1965 “disappearance” of Moroccan opposition leader Mehdi Ben Barka, human rights organizations said today in letters to the French and U.S. authorities.
October 27, 2001    Press Release

Letter to Secretary of State Colin Powell
Urging declassification of documents relating to Ben Barka disappearance
We are writing to urge you to support the declassification of all U.S. government documents relating to the abduction and enforced disappearance of Moroccan opposition leader Mehdi Ben Barka in Paris thirty-six years ago, on October 29, 1965.
October 26, 2001    Letter

Morocco: Human Rights Defenders Face Jail
Thirty-six human rights defenders face the possibility of imminent jail terms, as an appeal court in the capital, Rabat, prepares to re-examine their case on 17 September 2001.
September 14, 2001    Press Release

Morocco: Questionable Prosecution of Whistle-Blower
The Moroccan government should seriously investigate a retired police agent’s charges of official kidnapping and torture of government critics, Human Rights Watch said today.
August 30, 2001    Press Release

MAROC : LA CONDAMNATION D’UN TÉMOIN GÊNANT SOULÈVE DES
Human Rights Watch a estimé aujourd’hui que le gouvernement marocain devrait ouvrir une enquête sérieuse sur les déclarations d’un ancien agent des services spéciaux accusant les autorités d’avoir enlevé et torturé des opposants au régime.
August 30, 2001    Press Release

Morocco: Letter to Minister of Justice Omar Azzimane concerning Ahmed Boukhari
Human Rights Watch wrote to express its great concern at the state’s treatment of retired police agent Ahmed Boukhari. In late June, Mr. Boukhari disclosed his version of the involvement of Moroccan security forces in systematic human rights violations against Moroccan citizens in the 1960s and 1970s, including the 1965 abduction, torture and murder of opposition leader Mehdi Ben Barka.
August 30, 2001    Letter

Morocco: Child Soldiers Global Report 2001
From the Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers
There are no indications of under-18s in government armed forces.
June 12, 2001    Multi Country Report

Morocco Jails Thirty-Six Rights Activists
Human Rights Watch expressed dismay at the conviction and sentencing of thirty-six human rights activists in Morocco on charges of holding an illegal demonstration last December.
May 19, 2001    Press Release

Morocco: Action Urged on Legal Code Reform
New Royal Commission Must Include Women's Rights Activists
King Mohammed VI should appoint women's rights activists to a new royal commission on changing Morocco's "personal status" code, Human Rights Watch urged today.
March 20, 2001    Press Release


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