This website does readability filtering of other pages. All styles, scripts, forms and ads are stripped. If you want your website excluded or have other feedback, use this form.

Heavy Rainfall, Flash Flooding Expected in Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas Through Saturday | The Weather Channel

FREE In Google Play Get Show me the weather in... city, zip, or place Recently searched

  • No items to display
| Americas Africa Asia Pacific Europe Middle East | Back to menu Americas Africa Asia Pacific Europe Middle East All sections Weather Maps Severe Video & Photos Activities Health TV

Next Article

Refreshing Pattern Change to Scour Out Heat, Humidity in Central, Eastern U.S. This Week

Regional Forecast Video

Heavy Rainfall, Flash Flooding Expected in Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas Through Saturday

By Linda Lam

September 22 2018 08:30 PM EDT

weather.com

00:59

Record-Breaking Temperatures Possible in Southeast This Holiday Weekend

Meteorologist Danielle Banks says it is going to feel much more like mid-summer than the unofficial kickoff to summer this holiday weekend.

At a Glance

  • A frontal system will slowly move through parts of the South this weekend.
  • Flash flooding is a big concern from eastern Texas into western Tennessee on Saturday.
  • Moisture from the remnants of Tropical Depression Nineteen-E is enhancing rainfall.

Heavy rainfall and flash flooding are expected in portions of the southern Plains into the lower Mississippi Valley through Saturday.

This heavy rainfall is due to a frontal system that will move slowly southeastward this weekend, along with an upper-level disturbance that has moved into the southern Plains.

Abundant moisture has streamed into the region from both the remnants of Tropical Depression Nineteen-E from the Pacific and tropical moisture from the western Gulf of Mexico. Tropical Depression Nineteen-E was a short-lived tropical cyclone that dissipated in northwestern Mexico early Thursday. Its remnants, however, brought an increase in showers and thunderstorms into the Southwestern U.S. and this tropical moisture has pushed eastward.

Here are a few selected rainfall totals as of Saturday morning:

  • 15.81 inches in far northern Johnston County, Oklahoma
  • 15.50 inches near Stonewall, Oklahoma
  • 15.04 inches at Fittstown, Oklahoma
  • 10.82 inches in Centrahoma, Oklahoma
  • 8.85 inches at Bonham, Texas
  • 8.71 inches near McKinney, Texas
  • 7.48 inches at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

Dallas has set a new record for the wettest September on record with 10.90 inches of rainfall. Dallas has experienced the third wettest 24-hour period ending at 6 a.m. Saturday with 7.57 inches.

White Rock Creek in Dallas set a new record crest of 91.47 feet early Saturday.

San Antonio International Airport has totaled 16.74 inches of rainfall for September, making it the wettest September on record.

Storm Reports

In the 24 hours ending Thursday morning, Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, measured 2.38 inches of rainfall, which is more than all of its monthly rainfall totals since September 2014.

Flash flooding stranded a car in El Dorado, Texas early Friday afternoon. A helicopter was dispatched to save one individual from the roof of their car. A portion of Interstate 10 was closed west of Sonora, Texas due to flooding.

Many roads near and south of Ada, Oklahoma were impassable on Friday. Some roads have been washed out in Fittstown and Stonewall. At least four water rescues have been performed.

Pontotoc County, Oklahoma declared a state of emergency due to the flash flooding on Friday.

Friday evening, Interstate 35 east was shut down at State School Road in Denton, Texas due to water covering the roadway. Two houses were flooded in Argyle, Texas.

On Friday night, people were rescued from several vehicles in Dallas and there was also a swift water rescue in Arlington, Texas.

Water rescues were reported early Saturday near Venus, Texas.

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.