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1 filter applied Custom filter Jul 5th 2020 GMT Annals of Pure and Applied Logic forthcoming articles
  1. Finitely Generated Groups Are Universal Among Finitely Generated Structures.Matthew Harrison-Trainor & Meng-Che HodetailsLogic and Philosophy of Logic Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  2. |˜-Divisibility of Ultrafilters.Boris ŠobotdetailsLogic and Philosophy of Logic Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Bioethics forthcoming articles
  1. Rethinking Counselling in Prenatal Screening: An Ethical Analysis of Informed Consent in the Context of Non‐Invasive Prenatal Testing.Adriana Kater‐Kuipers, Inez D. Beaufort, Robert‐Jan H. Galjaard & Eline M. BunnikdetailsBiomedical Ethics in Applied Ethics Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Business Ethics: A European Review forthcoming articles
  1. Students' Perception of Corporate Social Responsibility: Analyzing the Influence of Gender, Academic Status, and Exposure to Business Ethics Education.Felix Okechukwu UgwuozordetailsNo categories Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Cognition volume 202, issue , 2020
  1. Intuitive Invention by Summative Imitation in Children and Adults.Francys Subiaul & Margaret A. StantondetailsCognitive Sciences Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
volume 204, issue , 2020
  1. Selective and Distributed Attention in Human and Pigeon Category Learning.Leyre Castro, Olivera Savic, Victor Navarro, Vladimir M. Sloutsky & Edward A. WassermandetailsCognitive Sciences Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  2. Which Bilinguals Reverse Language Dominance and Why?Mathieu Declerck, Daniel Kleinman & Tamar H. GollandetailsCognitive Sciences Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Cognitive Science volume 44, issue 7, 2020
  1. The Growth of Children's Semantic and Phonological Networks: Insight From 10 Languages.Abdellah Fourtassi, Yuan Bian & Michael C. FrankdetailsCognitive Sciences Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  2. Is Complex Visual Information Implicated During Language Comprehension? The Case of Cast Shadows.Oleksandr V. Horchak & Margarida Vaz GarridodetailsCognitive Sciences Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  3. Ontogenetic Emergence of Cognitive Reference Comprehension.Johanna Rüther & Ulf LiszkowskidetailsCognitive Sciences Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Complexity volume 2020, issue , 2020
  1. Habit or Utility: A Key Choice Point in Promoting the Adoption of Telehealth in China.Yun Fan, Sifeng Liu, Jun Liu, Saad Ahmed Javed & Zhigeng FangdetailsTelehealth, as an indispensable means of technical support in the Healthy China Strategy, currently has less than 20 percent adoption rate in China despite a great deal of government policies and investments. In the current study, to analyse the influencing factors behind doctors’ and patients’ adoption of telehealth, an asymmetric dynamic evolutionary game model of doctor-patient behaviour selection was established. Based on the model solution, the evolutionarily stable strategies that emerge in different situations were analysed. The results show that it (...) is difficult for the adoption of telehealth in China to keep pace with coverage due to the “dual low” nature of telehealth: both doctors’ utility from telehealth and patients’ telehealth cost threshold are too low to incentivize adoption. The strategy to promote the adoption of telehealth in China should include providing adequate training for doctors and patients on the use of telehealth technology, rewarding doctors who provide telehealth services and raising the threshold cost of patient’s telehealth adoption. (shrink) No categories Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  2. “Buy Online, Pick Up in Store” Under Fit Uncertainty: To Offer or Not to Offer.Huijing Li, Shilei Yang, Haiyan Kang & Victor ShidetailsRetailers offer BOPS service to improve consumers shopping experience. However, this greatly increases the decision complexity for retailers and consumers. For consumers, whether to purchase online or from a store with the BOPS service is a complex decision. This is especially true when the product has fit uncertainty. That is, consumers are uncertain about product fitness before using it. Also, their store visit cost can be heterogeneous and follows some distribution function. For a retailer, it needs to jointly optimize multiple (...) decisions including the convenience degree of BOPS. To help the retailer develop the jointly optimal decisions, we first build a mathematical model where the retailer sells the product through online and store channel and analyzes the possible effects of BOPS. We find that the retailer should offer BOPS when the channel cost ratio is large enough. Through numerical studies, we show that the ratio of profit offering BOPS divided by the benchmark increases with the probability of product fit, shipment fee, and the convenience degree of BOPS. We then consider the case where the convenience degree of BOPS is also a decision itself. We find the optimal convenience degree of BOPS increases along with the average store visit cost and the probability of product fit. When the cost factor of offering the convenience for BOPS is larger than a threshold, the retailer should never offer BOPS. (shrink) No categories Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  3. Dynamic Green Innovation Decision of the Supply Chain with Innovating and Free-Riding Manufacturers: Cooperation and Spillover.Feifei Zhang, Zaixu Zhang, Yawei Xue, Jian Zhang & Yang ChedetailsGreen innovation for supply chain has attracted much academic attention. Yet, there is no adequate understanding of how spillover and cooperation can impact the enterprises’ green innovation decisions in the presence of free-rider. Besides, the dynamic impact of green innovation on emission is still lack of attention. We develop a differential game model that explicitly considers a supply chain with two types of manufacturers to examine the dynamics of green innovation. The analysis reveals that under the noncooperation mode, the emissions (...) and profits of free-riding manufacturers are found to be lower than that of innovating manufacturers, but technology spillovers will narrow the gap between them. Under the cooperation mode, there would be greater innovation efforts of green manufacturers and lesser efforts of green suppliers. Moreover, technology spillovers will have less impact on optimal decision changes. The profit of free-riding manufacturers is higher than that of innovating manufacturers, but the initial market power will affect the changes in their sales and profits. Meanwhile, cooperation will increase the total emission amount and long-term profits of the green supply chain, and technology spillovers of green manufacturers will help narrow the emission gap and broaden the profit gap, while that of the suppliers will have the opposite effect. The present study provides a new perspective for research on green innovation decisions for supply chain. (shrink) No categories Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Cortex volume 129, issue , 2020
  1. Aesthetics and Morality Judgements Share Functional Neuroarchitecture.Nora Heinzelmann, Susanna Weber & Philippe ToblerdetailsPhilosophers have predominantly regarded morality and aesthetics judgments as fundamentally different. However, whether this claim is empirically founded has remained unclear. In a novel task, we measured brain activity of participants judging the aesthetic beauty of artwork or the moral goodness of actions depicted. To control for the content of judgments, participants assessed the age of the artworks and the speed of depicted actions. Univariate analyses revealed whole-brain corrected, content-controlled common activation for aesthetics and morality judgments in frontopolar, dorsomedial and (...) ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. Temporoparietal cortex showed activation specific for morality judgments, occipital cortex for aesthetics judgments. Multivariate analyses revealed both common and distinct whole-brain corrected representations for morality and aesthetics judgments in temporoparietal and prefrontal regions. Overall, neural commonalities are more pronounced than predominant philosophical views would predict. They are compatible with minority accounts that stress commonalities between aesthetics and morality judgments, such as sentimentalism and a valuation framework. (shrink) Neurophilosophy in Philosophy of Cognitive Science Export citation   Bookmark  
European Journal of Political Theory volume 19, issue 3, 2019
  1. 5 From Concept to Conceptions: Can the Broad View Overcome the Debate Between Orthodox and Political Theories of Human Rights?Daniel P. CorrigandetailsIn Humanity without Dignity, Sangiovanni offers an interesting new approach to human rights theory called the “Broad View” of human rights. The BV involves an innovative attempt to overcome th... Justifications of Human Rights in Social and Political Philosophy Political Theory in Social and Political Philosophy Rights, Misc in Social and Political Philosophy The Concept of Human Rights in Social and Political Philosophy Direct download (3 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  2. Introduction.Johannes Haaf, Jan-Philipp Kruse & Luise K. MüllerdetailsEuropean Journal of Political Theory, Ahead of Print. Social and Political Philosophy Direct download (3 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  3. An Interpretation of Political Argument.William BosworthdetailsHow do we determine whether individuals accept the actual consistency of a political argument instead of just its rhetorical good looks? This article answers this question by proposing an interpretation of political argument within the constraints of political liberalism. It utilises modern developments in the philosophy of logic and language to reclaim ‘meaningless nonsense’ from use as a partisan war cry and to build up political argument as something more than a power struggle between competing conceptions of the good. Standard (...) solutions for ‘clarifying’ meaning through descriptive definition encounter difficulties with the biases of status quo idioms, as well as partisan translations and circularity. Collectively called linguistic gerrymandering, these difficulties threaten political liberalism’s underlying coherency. The proposed interpretation of political argument overcomes this with a new brand of conceptual analysis that can falsifiably determine whether rhetoric has hijacked political argument. (shrink) Social and Political Philosophy Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  4. 19 On ‘Aristocratic’ Dignity.Adam EtinsondetailsIn his recent book, Andrea Sangiovanni raises various objections against what he calls the “aristocratic” conception of dignity – the idea that dignity represents a kind of high- ranking social status. In this short article, I suggest that Sangiovanni gives the aristocrats less credit than they deserve. Not only do his objections target an uncharitably narrow version of the view, Sangiovanni surreptitiously incorporates aspects of the aristocratic conception of dignity into his own (supposedly non-dignitarian) theory of moral equality. Ancient Greek Political Philosophy in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy Political Views in Social and Political Philosophy Direct download (4 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  5. 8 Two Concerns About the Rejection of Social Cruelty as the Basis of Moral Equality.Giacomo FlorisdetailsIn his recent book, Humanity without Dignity: Moral Equality, Respect, and Human Rights, Andrea Sangiovanni argues that the principle of moral equality should be grounded in the wrongness of treating others as inferiors insofar as this constitutes an act of social cruelty. In this short piece, I will raise two concerns about the rejection of social cruelty as the basis of moral equality: first, Sangiovanni’s account seems to give rise to disturbing implications as to how those beings that have basic (...) moral status relate to each other. Second, grounding moral equality in the rejection of social cruelty may fail to capture some wrongs qua violation of moral equality. (shrink) Basic Equality in Social and Political Philosophy Direct download (3 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  6. 6 Universal Concern, Contingency and the Single Practice Assumption: Sangiovanni’s Theory of Human Rights.Luise K. Müller & Johannes HaafdetailsContribution for book symposium on Andrea Sangiovanni's Humanity without Dignity. Equality, Misc in Social and Political Philosophy Human Rights in Social and Political Philosophy Direct download (3 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  7. 7 Replies.Andrea SangiovannidetailsIn this article, I reply to Giacomo Floris, Adam Etinson, Daniel Corrigan, Luise Müller and Johannes Haaf. Equality, Misc in Social and Political Philosophy Human Rights in Social and Political Philosophy Direct download (3 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Foundations of Chemistry forthcoming articles
  1. A new definition of reduction between two scientific theories: no reduction of chemistry to quantum mechanics.Antonino DragodetailsAll suggested notions of reduction of two scientific theories are critically reviewed and analyzed. In particular those applied to the case of the alleged reduction of Chemistry to Quantum mechanics are examined. Since it is recognized that the weakness of this field of research is the lack of a definition of a scientific theory, it is suggested that a scientific theory is characterized by two choices regarding two dichotomies, that is, the kind of mathematics and the kind of logic. According (...) to this view a reduction is only possible between two theories in which the same choices are shared. As a consequence, only one case of reduction in the history of physics is recognized: physical optics to electromagnetism, a case that is commonly accepted. The other cases of claimed reductions are recognized as impossible, owing to the different choices of the two theories at issue and hence the radical variations in meaning of their shared basic notions. In particular, the claimed reduction of Chemistry to Quantum mechanics is disproved in detail. (shrink) No categories Direct download (2 more)   Translate   Export citation   Bookmark  
Hts Theological Studies volume 76, issue 1, 2020
  1. The Importance and Challenges of Money in Christian Missions.Akinyemi O. AlawodedetailsNo categories Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
volume 76, issue 4, 2020
  1. Patriarchy and Marital Disharmony Amongst Nigerian Christians: Ephesians 5:22–33 as a Response.Solomon O. AdemilukadetailsNo categories Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
International Journal of Hindu Studies forthcoming articles
  1. The Problem of Indifference to Suffering in the Mahābhārata Tradition.Vishal SharmadetailsIndian Philosophy in Asian Philosophy Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Journal of Academic Ethics forthcoming articles
  1. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Study Helper Websites: A New Practice in Collaborative Cheating.Douglas Harrison, Allison Patch, Darragh McNally & Laura HarrisdetailsDrawing on a survey of over 4000 students and 1300 faculty members at the University of Maryland Global Campus, we find evidence for a reconceptualization of the use of commercialized websites offering access to “tutors” or “study help” as a type of collaborative cheating. Past studies have examined this behavior as an extension of contract cheating, but we find that students perceive the use of these sites very differently than they perceive contract cheating behaviors. In this paper we will discuss (...) how “tutor” or “study helper” websites combine the phenomena of collaborative cheating with internet-driven shifts in cultural and social perceptions to create a new type of cheating behavior that is viewed differently by students and faculty. (shrink) Academic and Teaching Ethics in Philosophy of Social Science Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Médecine et Droit forthcoming articles
  1. L’Étrange Victoire.François VialladetailsNo categories Direct download (2 more)   Translate   Export citation   Bookmark  
Philosophical Psychology forthcoming articles
  1. Why Do Ethicists Eat Their Greens?Andrew SneddondetailsPhilosophy of Cognitive Science Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Political Theory forthcoming articles
  1. Fred Moten’s Refusals and Consents: The Politics of Fugitivity.George ShulmandetailsThis essay analyzes Fred Moten’s “antipolitical” romance with the “fugitive black sociality” that he radically opposes to “politics,” defined as inescapably tied to antiblack modernity. By comparing Moten’s argument to other voices in the black radical tradition, and by triangulating Moten with Hannah Arendt and Sheldon Wolin, this essay opens inherited conceptions of the political to risk and reworking but also complicates figurations of fugitivity and resists the antagonism Moten posits between black fugitivity and democratic politics. Social and Political Philosophy Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Politics, Philosophy and Economics volume 19, issue 2, 2020
  1. 7 How Perspective-Based Aggregation Undermines the Pareto Principle.Itai SherdetailsThe Pareto principle is a normative principle about preferences that advocates concordance with unanimous preference. However, people have perspectives not just preferences. Evaluating preferences... Social and Political Philosophy Direct download (3 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Synthese forthcoming articles
  1. 1 Out of Habit.Santiago AmayadetailsThis paper argues that habits, just like beliefs, can guide intentional action. To do this, a variety of real-life cases where a person acts habitually but contrary to her beliefs are discussed. The cases serve as dissociations showing that intentional agency is possible without doxastic guidance. The upshot is a model for thinking about the rationality of habitual action and the rationalizing role that habits can play in it. The model highlights the role that our history and institutions play in (...) shaping what actions become habitual for us. (shrink) Philosophy of Action Philosophy of Mind Value Theory, Miscellaneous Direct download   Export citation   Bookmark  
Jul 4th 2020 GMT Agriculture and Human Values forthcoming articles
  1. 1 When farmers are pulled in too many directions: comparing institutional drivers of food safety and environmental sustainability in California agriculture.Patrick BaurdetailsAspirations to farm ‘better’ may fall short in practice due to constraints outside of farmers’ control. Yet farmers face proliferating pressures to adopt practices that align with various societal visions of better agriculture. What happens when the accumulation of external pressures overwhelms farm management capacity? Or, worse, when different visions of better agriculture pull farmers toward conflicting management paradigms? This article addresses these questions by comparing the institutional manifestations of two distinct societal obligations placed on California fruit and vegetable farmers: (...) to practice sustainable agriculture and to ensure food safety. Drawing on the concept of constrained choice, I define and utilize a framework for comparison comprising five types of institutions that shape farm management decisions: rules and standards, market and supply chain forces, legal liability, social networks and norms, and scientific knowledge and available technologies. Several insights emerge. One, farmers are expected to meet multiple societal obligations concurrently; when facing a “right-versus-right” choice, farmers are likely to favor the more feasible course within structural constraints. Second, many institutions are designed to pursue narrow or siloed objectives; policy interventions that aim to shift farming practice should thus anticipate and address potential conflicts among institutions with diverging aspirations. Third, farms operating at different scales may face distinct institutional drivers in some cases, but not others, due to differential preferences for universal versus place-specific policies. These insights suggest that policy interventions should engage not just farmers, but also the intersecting institutions that drive or constrain their farm management choices. As my framework demonstrates, complementing the concept of constrained choice with insights from institutional theory can more precisely reveal the dimensions and mechanisms that bound farmer agency and shape farm management paradigms. Improved understanding of these structures, I suggest, may lead to novel opportunities to transform agriculture through institutional designs that empower, rather than constrain, farmer choice. (shrink) No categories Direct download (2 more)   Translate   Export citation   Bookmark  
Annals of Pure and Applied Logic volume 172, issue 1, 2021
  1. 1 Filter-Linkedness and its Effect on Preservation of Cardinal Characteristics.Jörg Brendle, Miguel A. Cardona & Diego A. MejíadetailsLogic and Philosophy of Logic Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Applied Ontology forthcoming articles
  1. 1 CODI: A Multidimensional Theory of Mereotopology with Closure Operations.Torsten HahmanndetailsNo categories Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Argument and Computation forthcoming articles
  1. Rationality and Maximal Consistent Sets for a Fragment of ASPIC + Without Undercut.Jesse Heyninck & Christian StraßerdetailsScience, Logic, and Mathematics Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Asian Journal of Business Ethics forthcoming articles
  1. 1 Exclusive Talent Management and its Consequences: A Review of Literature. [REVIEW]Rajneet Bhatia & Papori BaruahdetailsBusiness Ethics in Applied Ethics Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
Axiomathes volume 30, issue 4, 2020
  1. 3 Wigner’s Puzzle on Applicability of Mathematics: On What Table to Assemble It?Cătălin BărboianudetailsAttempts at solving what has been labeled as Eugene Wigner’s puzzle of applicability of mathematics are still far from arriving at an acceptable solution. The accounts developed to explain the “miracle” of applied mathematics vary in nature, foundation, and solution, from denying the existence of a genuine problem to designing structural theories based on mathematical formalism. Despite this variation, all investigations treated the problem in a unitary way with respect to the target, pointing to one or two ‘why’ or ‘how’ (...) questions to be answered. In this paper, I argue that two analyses, a semantic analysis ab initio and a metatheoretical analysis starting from the types of unreasonableness involved in this problem, will establish the interdisciplinary character of the problem and reveal many more targets, which may be addressed with different methodologies. In order to address objectively the philosophical problem of applicability of mathematics, a foundational revision of the problem is needed. (shrink) Science, Logic, and Mathematics Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  2. 5 Duration Enough for Presentism.Robert E. PezetdetailsThis paper considers a problem for dynamic presentism that has received little attention: its apparent inability to accommodate the duration of events. After outlining the problem, I defend presentism from it. This defence proceeds in two stages. First, I argue the objection rests on a faulty assumption: that duration is temporal extension. The paper challenges that assumption on several different ways of conceiving of temporal extension. This is the negative case and forms the bulk of the paper. Second, after diagnosing (...) the error leading to the identification of duration with temporal extension, I outline a new presentist-friendly account of duration that avoids the problem. In particular, a non-reductive account of duration is offered that treats it as a primitive quality which bestows its possessor with a certain modal quality: that the possessor potentially does not change whilst there are changes in its environs. This is the positive case. Together the positive and negative cases provide presentism with an interesting and novel way of overcoming the problem of duration. (shrink) No categories Direct download (2 more)   Translate   Export citation   Bookmark  
  3. 31 Strong Pluralism, Coincident Objects and Haecceitism.Karol Lenart & Artur SzachniewiczdetailsAccording to strong pluralism, objects distinct by virtue of their modal properties can coincide. The most common objection towards such view invokes the so-called Grounding Problem according to which the strong pluralist needs to explain what the grounds are for supposed modal differences between the coincidents. As recognized in the literature, the failure to provide an answer to the Grounding Problem critically undermines the plausibility of strong pluralism. Moreover, there are strong reasons to believe that strong pluralists cannot provide an (...) explanation of the Grounding Problem. In this paper, we argue that strong pluralism can be motivated independently of the successful answer to the Grounding Problem. In order to achieve that aim, we provide a haecceitistic interpretation of strong pluralism according to which strong pluralism should be read as a position committed to the existence of primitive individuals, i.e., the individuals that have their criteria of individuation independently of their qualitative profiles. That said, we do not aim at defending haecceitism. Instead, our aim is rather modest: we want to provide a new way for the strong pluralist to supplement his view to make it more watertight. (shrink) Bundle Theories in Metaphysics Coincident Objects in Metaphysics Haecceitism in Metaphysics Identity of Indiscernibles in Metaphysics Objects and Properties, Misc in Metaphysics Substratum Theories in Metaphysics Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  4. 12 Reality and Super-Reality: Properties of a Mathematical Multiverse.Alan McKenziedetailsEver since its foundations were laid nearly a century ago, quantum theory has provoked questions about the very nature of reality. We address these questions by considering the universe—and the multiverse—fundamentally as complex patterns, or mathematical structures. Basic mathematical structures can be expressed more simply in terms of emergent parameters. Even simple mathematical structures can interact within their own structural environment, in a rudimentary form of self-awareness, which suggests a definition of reality in a mathematical structure as simply the complete (...) structure. The absolute randomness of quantum outcomes is most satisfactorily explained by a multiverse of discrete, parallel universes. Some of these have to be identical to each other, but that introduces a dilemma, because each mathematical structure must be unique. The resolution is that the parallel universes must be embedded within a mathematical structure—the multiverse—which allows universes to be identical within themselves, but nevertheless distinct, as determined by their position in the structure. The multiverse needs more emergent parameters than our universe and so it can be considered to be a superstructure. Correspondingly, its reality can be called a super-reality. While every universe in the multiverse is part of the super-reality, the complete super-reality is forever beyond the horizon of any of its component universes. (shrink) Science, Logic, and Mathematics Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  5. 6 Reality and Super-Reality: Properties of a Mathematical Multiverse.Alan McKenziedetailsEver since its foundations were laid nearly a century ago, quantum theory has provoked questions about the very nature of reality. We address these questions by considering the universe—and the multiverse—fundamentally as complex patterns, or mathematical structures. Basic mathematical structures can be expressed more simply in terms of emergent parameters. Even simple mathematical structures can interact within their own structural environment, in a rudimentary form of self-awareness, which suggests a definition of reality in a mathematical structure as simply the complete (...) structure. The absolute randomness of quantum outcomes is most satisfactorily explained by a multiverse of discrete, parallel universes. Some of these have to be identical to each other, but that introduces a dilemma, because each mathematical structure must be unique. The resolution is that the parallel universes must be embedded within a mathematical structure—the multiverse—which allows universes to be identical within themselves, but nevertheless distinct, as determined by their position in the structure. The multiverse needs more emergent parameters than our universe and so it can be considered to be a superstructure. Correspondingly, its reality can be called a super-reality. While every universe in the multiverse is part of the super-reality, the complete super-reality is forever beyond the horizon of any of its component universes. (shrink) Science, Logic, and Mathematics Direct download (2 more)   Translate   Export citation   Bookmark  
  6. 4 Reality and Super-Reality: Properties of a Mathematical Multiverse.Alan McKenziedetailsEver since its foundations were laid nearly a century ago, quantum theory has provoked questions about the very nature of reality. We address these questions by considering the universe—and the multiverse—fundamentally as complex patterns, or mathematical structures. Basic mathematical structures can be expressed more simply in terms of emergent parameters. Even simple mathematical structures can interact within their own structural environment, in a rudimentary form of self-awareness, which suggests a definition of reality in a mathematical structure as simply the complete (...) structure. The absolute randomness of quantum outcomes is most satisfactorily explained by a multiverse of discrete, parallel universes. Some of these have to be identical to each other, but that introduces a dilemma, because each mathematical structure must be unique. The resolution is that the parallel universes must be embedded within a mathematical structure—the multiverse—which allows universes to be identical within themselves, but nevertheless distinct, as determined by their position in the structure. The multiverse needs more emergent parameters than our universe and so it can be considered to be a superstructure. Correspondingly, its reality can be called a super-reality. While every universe in the multiverse is part of the super-reality, the complete super-reality is forever beyond the horizon of any of its component universes. (shrink) No categories Direct download (2 more)   Translate   Export citation   Bookmark  
  7. 6 Reality and Super-Reality: Properties of a Mathematical Multiverse.Alan McKenziedetailsEver since its foundations were laid nearly a century ago, quantum theory has provoked questions about the very nature of reality. We address these questions by considering the universe—and the multiverse—fundamentally as complex patterns, or mathematical structures. Basic mathematical structures can be expressed more simply in terms of emergent parameters. Even simple mathematical structures can interact within their own structural environment, in a rudimentary form of self-awareness, which suggests a definition of reality in a mathematical structure as simply the complete (...) structure. The absolute randomness of quantum outcomes is most satisfactorily explained by a multiverse of discrete, parallel universes. Some of these have to be identical to each other, but that introduces a dilemma, because each mathematical structure must be unique. The resolution is that the parallel universes must be embedded within a mathematical structure—the multiverse—which allows universes to be identical within themselves, but nevertheless distinct, as determined by their position in the structure. The multiverse needs more emergent parameters than our universe and so it can be considered to be a superstructure. Correspondingly, its reality can be called a super-reality. While every universe in the multiverse is part of the super-reality, the complete super-reality is forever beyond the horizon of any of its component universes. (shrink) Science, Logic, and Mathematics Direct download (2 more)   Translate   Export citation   Bookmark  
  8. 31 Duration Enough for Presentism.Robert E. PezetdetailsThis paper considers a problem for dynamic presentism that has received little attention: its apparent inability to accommodate the duration of events. After outlining the problem, I defend presentism from it. This defence proceeds in two stages. First, I argue the objection rests on a faulty assumption: that duration is temporal extension. The paper challenges that assumption on several different ways of conceiving of temporal extension. This is the negative case and forms the bulk of the paper. Second, after diagnosing (...) the error leading to the identification of duration with temporal extension, I outline a new presentist-friendly account of duration that avoids the problem. In particular, a non-reductive account of duration is offered that treats it as a primitive quality which bestows its possessor with a certain modal quality: that the possessor potentially does not change whilst there are changes in its environs. This is the positive case. Together the positive and negative cases provide presentism with an interesting and novel way of overcoming the problem of duration. (shrink) Science, Logic, and Mathematics Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  9. 5 Two Models of the Subject–Properties Structure.Marek PiwowarczykdetailsIn the paper I discuss the problem of the nature of the relationship between objects and their properties. There are three contexts of the problem: of comparison, of change and of interaction. Philosophical explanations of facts indicated in the three contexts need reference to properties and to a proper understanding of a relationship between them and their bearers. My aim is to get closer to this understanding with the use of some models but previously I present the substantialist theory of (...) object and shortly argue for its main theses. The two models enabling us the understanding of the subject–properties structure are: the plastic stuff model and the functional model. On the ground of the first a subject is compared to a piece of plastic stuff which is informed by different shapes. Properties are ways how a subject is, they “give” some “figure” to a subject. The core idea of the second model is that essences are immanent functional laws governing correlations of properties. As such they are similar to mathematical functions which are saturated by values. The relationship between a subject and properties can be grasped by analogy to such a saturation. (shrink) Science, Logic, and Mathematics Direct download (2 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  10. 3 Two Models of the Subject–Properties Structure.Marek PiwowarczykdetailsIn the paper I discuss the problem of the nature of the relationship between objects and their properties. There are three contexts of the problem: of comparison, of change and of interaction. Philosophical explanations of facts indicated in the three contexts need reference to properties and to a proper understanding of a relationship between them and their bearers. My aim is to get closer to this understanding with the use of some models but previously I present the substantialist theory of (...) object and shortly argue for its main theses. The two models enabling us the understanding of the subject–properties structure are: the plastic stuff model and the functional model. On the ground of the first a subject is compared to a piece of plastic stuff which is informed by different shapes. Properties are ways how a subject is, they “give” some “figure” to a subject. The core idea of the second model is that essences are immanent functional laws governing correlations of properties. As such they are similar to mathematical functions which are saturated by values. The relationship between a subject and properties can be grasped by analogy to such a saturation. (shrink) No categories Direct download (2 more)   Translate   Export citation   Bookmark  
  11. 1 Two Models of the Subject–Properties Structure.Marek PiwowarczykdetailsIn the paper I discuss the problem of the nature of the relationship between objects and their properties. There are three contexts of the problem: of comparison, of change and of interaction. Philosophical explanations of facts indicated in the three contexts need reference to properties and to a proper understanding of a relationship between them and their bearers. My aim is to get closer to this understanding with the use of some models but previously I present the substantialist theory of (...) object and shortly argue for its main theses. The two models enabling us the understanding of the subject–properties structure are: the plastic stuff model and the functional model. On the ground of the first a subject is compared to a piece of plastic stuff which is informed by different shapes. Properties are ways how a subject is, they “give” some “figure” to a subject. The core idea of the second model is that essences are immanent functional laws governing correlations of properties. As such they are similar to mathematical functions which are saturated by values. The relationship between a subject and properties can be grasped by analogy to such a saturation. (shrink) Science, Logic, and Mathematics Direct download (2 more)   Translate   Export citation   Bookmark  
Bioethics forthcoming articles
  1. 1 Rethinking Counselling in Prenatal Screening: An Ethical Analysis of Informed Consent in the Context of Non‐Invasive Prenatal Testing.Adriana Kater‐Kuipers, Inez D. De Beaufort, Robert‐Jan H. Galjaard & Eline M. BunnikdetailsBiomedical Ethics in Applied Ethics Direct download (3 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
British Journal for the History of Philosophy volume 28, issue 4, 2019
  1. 12 Alleviating Love’s Rage: Hegel on Shame and Sexual Recognition.Gal KatzdetailsThe paper reconstructs Hegel’s account of shame as a fundamental affect. Qua spiritual, the human individual strives for self-determination; hence she is ashamed of the fact that, q... History of Western Philosophy Direct download (4 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
  2. 7 When Aristotelian Virtuous Agents Acquire the Fine for Themselves, What Are They Acquiring?Bradford Jean-Hyuk KimdetailsIn the Nicomachean Ethics, one of Aristotle’s most frequent characterizations of the virtuous agent is that she acts for the sake of the fine (to kalon). In IX.8, this pursuit of the fine receives a more specific description; virtuous agents maximally assign the fine to themselves. In this paper, I answer the question of how we are to understand the fine as individually and maximally acquirable. I analyze Nicomachean Ethics IX.7, where Aristotle highlights virtuous activity (energeia) as central to the (...) fine, and argue that when virtuous agents pursue the fine, what they are pursuing is virtuous activity. I then address various problems, like how virtuous people can maximize virtuous activity yet sacrifice their lives, which would seem to amount to sacrificing future opportunities to virtuous activity and therefore not maximizing it. I also eliminate alternative interpretations that do not take virtuous activity as necessary to the fine, for example the common good interpretation, whereby virtuous agents pursuing the fine amounts to their pursuing the common good. (shrink) Aristotle: Ethics, Misc in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy Classical Greek Philosophy in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy Direct download (4 more)   Export citation   Bookmark  
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