From the Cover: On the origin of smallpox: Correlating variola phylogenics with

Sign on

SAO/NASA ADS General Science Abstract Service


· Find Similar Abstracts (with default settings below)
· Electronic Refereed Journal Article (HTML)
· Full Refereed Journal Article (PDF/Postscript)
· References in the article
· Citations to the Article (7) (Citation History)
· Refereed Citations to the Article
· Reads History
·
· Translate This Page
Title:
From the Cover: On the origin of smallpox: Correlating variola phylogenics with historical smallpox records Authors:
Li, Yu; Carroll, Darin S.; Gardner, Shea N.; Walsh, Matthew C.; Vitalis, Elizabeth A.; Damon, Inger K. Affiliation:
AA(Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases, Coordinating Centers for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329; Pathogen Bio-Informatics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550), AB(Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases, Coordinating Centers for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329; Pathogen Bio-Informatics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550), AC(Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases, Coordinating Centers for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329; Pathogen Bio-Informatics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550), AD(Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases, Coordinating Centers for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329; Pathogen Bio-Informatics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550), AE(Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases, Coordinating Centers for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329; Pathogen Bio-Informatics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550), AF(Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases, Coordinating Centers for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329; Pathogen Bio-Informatics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550) Publication:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Volume 104, Issue 40, 2007, pp.15787-15792 Publication Date:
10/2007 Origin:
CROSSREF; PNAS DOI:
10.1073/pnas.0609268104 Bibliographic Code:
2007PNAS..10415787L

Abstract

Human disease likely attributable to variola virus (VARV), the etiologic agent of smallpox, has been reported in human populations for >2,000 years. VARV is unique among orthopoxviruses in that it is an exclusively human pathogen. Because VARV has a large, slowly evolving DNA genome, we were able to construct a robust phylogeny of VARV by analyzing concatenated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genome sequences of 47 VARV isolates with broad geographic distributions. Our results show two primary VARV clades, which likely diverged from an ancestral African rodent-borne variola-like virus either ≈16,000 or ≈68,000 years before present (YBP), depending on which historical records (East Asian or African) are used to calibrate the molecular clock. One primary clade was represented by the Asian VARV major strains, the more clinically severe form of smallpox, which spread from Asia either 400 or 1,600 YBP. Another primary clade included both alastrim minor, a phenotypically mild smallpox described from the American continents, and isolates from West Africa. This clade diverged from an ancestral VARV either 1,400 or 6,300 YBP, and then further diverged into two subclades at least 800 YBP. All of these analyses indicate that the divergence of alastrim and variola major occurred earlier than previously believed.
Bibtex entry for this abstract   Preferred format for this abstract (see Preferences)